Egypt seeks to develop Polo professionals

first_imgIn Egypt, polo used to be a popular sport among the elite society for centuries. It wasn’t until the Egyptian 1952 Revolution that swept the king, that the sport faded away.In the 90s, the few who played game started once again.  Our correspondent Adel EL Mahrouky talked to a local team on the progress of the sport in this report. Reviving Egypt’s Treasures Africa’s funniest man now seeks global recognition Related Talk Africa: President Xi in Egyptlast_img

Continue reading

West Indies hungry for success, says Barath

first_img Sharing is caring! Share Share Tweet 14 Views   no discussionscenter_img NewsSports West Indies hungry for success, says Barath by: – June 7, 2012 Share Adrian Barath. Photo credit: zimbio.comBIRMINGHAM, England — Adrian Barath said West Indies still had a strong desire to collect their first Test victory in England for more than a decade, when they face the hosts in the third and final Test, starting on Thursday at Edgbaston.The Windies opener said on Tuesday that the visitors were looking to sign off the Test series against England with a flourish, giving convincing proof that they were an improving side.West Indies trail 0-2 in the three-Test series, following a five-wicket defeat in the first Test at Lord’s in London and a nine-wicket loss in the second Test at Trent Bridge in Nottingham.“It’s important, having not had any wins in the series so far, that we finish well in this last Test,” he said.“There is a lot at stake. We’re really looking forward to getting a win here and bringing some pride to the West Indies.”Barath said it frustrating that West Indies dominate matches for periods at a time, but their hard work unravelled due to one weak hour or session.“That’s the mindset we’re working on – but when we get into those situations we need to really lock down,” he said.“That is what Test cricket is all about. It’s not a couple of hours; it’s over the course of five days. You have to be on the money every day – every hour, every over.”Heavy cloud cover and chilly temperatures greeted the Caribbean side, when they trained at the match venue with new arrival, off-spinner Sunil Narine generating plenty of interest.“Sunil has made a name for himself before he has played a Test match, so he has a lot of confidence in his own ability,” said Barath.“Once he is given the opportunity of a West Indies Test cap, I think he will represent us to the best of his ability, try to work to the team plans, and get some wickets, so that we can see what he is capable of doing.”Barath said it would be interesting to see how Narine bowls in English conditions, but felt the mohawk-wearing spinner had the ability to adapt.“He has the ability to be a World-class bowler and I think what is good about him is that he is always trying to figure out ways to improve and develop new deliveries because he knows everyone will look to attack him,” said Barath. Caribbean News Nowlast_img read more

Continue reading

Wenger: I’m convinced Barcelona will buy another striker

first_imgArsene Wenger is “convinced” Barcelona will sign another forward despite expecting improvement from Antoine Griezmann. Griezmann has struggled to hit top form in his first season at Barca, scoring 14 goals in 37 games since his €120 million ($135m) arrival from Atletico Madrid. Barca are heavily linked with a move for Inter star Lautaro Martinez, who is considered a long-term replacement for Luis Suarez. Former Arsenal manager Wenger believes Griezmann will improve, but feels Barcelona will add another forward this close season. “Barcelona has always bought the greatest players. Personally, I’m not sure that Suarez needs to be replaced,” he told beIN SPORTS. “They can add another striker because it’s true that Suarez and [Lionel] Messi are the main contributors and they might need somebody else who can score goals.“I still think Griezmann at some stage will start to score goals, he doesn’t look completely adapted, maybe now after confinement he will be refreshed because he’s a good goalscorer as well. “But I’m convinced they will buy another striker as well.” While Messi has scored 24 goals this season, Suarez has – like Griezmann – contributed 14, although he has played in 14 fewer games. Barcelona, two points clear atop La Liga, resume their campaign away to Mallorca on Saturday. Martin Braithwaite was one attacker the Catalans have recently added to their squad, with the Danish forward linking up with the club in February. read also:Arsenal fans want Wenger back as new chairmanWhile yet to score and set to see his play time limited further upon La Liga’s return, Braithwaite is relishing the chance to learn from Suarez and train at a club like Barca. “I am so happy that Luis is back because when I came here he was injured and I haven’t played with him,” he told Goal. “I want to learn from him, he is one of the best strikers in the world and I am happy he is back. “The training is totally different to what I was used to so I can feel I am developing a lot in the technical level. As a human I can feel I have more attention in such a big club like this but you must learn to live with all this attention.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Promoted Content7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black Holes7 Theories About The Death Of Our Universe7 Worst Things To Do To Your PhoneThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s HystericalThe 10 Most Irresistible Asian ActressesYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseMeghan And Harry’s Royal Baby: Everything You Need To KnowCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldThe Absolute 10 Greatest Shows In HBO Historylast_img read more

Continue reading

Messi wins court case against cycling company over logo

first_imgRelatedPosts Vidal lands in Milan to complete move from Barca to Inter Barca president Bartomeu says he won’t go to war anymore with Messi Pjanic always confident he will play with ‘greatest-ever’ Messi FC Barcelona and Argentina captain Lionel Messi has won a legal battle over trademark rights relating to his own logo.This was after the European Union’s top court on Thursday dismissed an appeal against the player from a Spanish cycling clothing brand.The EU’s Court of Justice in Luxembourg said in a statement it had authorised the player to register the trademark Messi.It dismissed an appeal from the EU’s intellectual property office EUIPO and the Spanish company Massi.Messi first filed an application with the property office in 2011 to trademark his surname as a sportswear, footwear and equipment brand.This was in spite of opposition from the owners of Massi, who argued that the player’s brand would cause confusion to customers.The EU property office upheld their complaint in 2013.While an appeal from Messi the following year was dismissed, an appeal to the EU’s General Court in 2018 led to the original ruling being annulled.The statement added that the Court of Justice had dismissed an appeal by the clothing brand and EUIPO against the annulment.It said the General Court was correct to say Messi’s reputation was a relevant factor in establishing a difference between the player’s brand and the cycling company.The 33-year-old Messi has been named the world footballer of the year, a record six times and is the all-time top scorer for FC Barcelona, Argentina and in Spanish football.He was named the world’s wealthiest football player by Forbes earlier this month, pocketing an estimated 92 million dollars from his salary from Barca plus 34 million dollars in endorsements.The Argentinian made global headlines last month for declaring his intention to leave FC Barcelona, where he has spent his entire career.He eventually decided to stay because he did not wish to face a legal battle with the club. (Reuters/NAN)Tags: FC BarcelonaMessiTrademark rightslast_img read more

Continue reading

Moyes: Refs must look after Januzaj

first_img Januzaj appeared to be stamped on by Sascha Riether during injury-time in Saturday’s 3-1 win at Fulham. The incident was not spotted by referee Lee Probert, with Moyes claiming immediately afterwards he had not seen it either. Manchester United manager David Moyes has demanded more protection for teenage winger Adnan Januzaj. Riether was charged with violent conduct by the Football Association over the incident on Monday, becoming the first player to be charged under a pilot scheme where a panel of three former referees reviews video evidence of incidents not seen by match officials. Having viewed the replays himself, the United boss feels Januzaj needs more protection than he is presently receiving. “I had not seen it until after the game,” Moyes said. “The distance we were from the dug-out made it impossible to take it in. “It is a bad stamp and it does look deliberate.” Speaking before being made aware of the FA charge, Moyes said of the incident: “That is for the referee to deal with on the day as far as I am concerned. It is over now. “But I do think Adnan is going to need a little bit of protection or we are going to find that he is getting kicked up and down. “I do think he deserves a little bit more than he is getting at this present time.” Moyes accepts the nature of the modern game means Januzaj will be targeted. Having already reprimanded Ashley Young for diving this season, it is clear the Scot will not tolerate the teenager play-acting in an attempt to gain an advantage. “We have spoken to him about it,” said Moyes. “He gets kicked up and down in training every day. But he gets up. “He has learned from the good professionals that he has got to get on with it and accept it. “He only needs to look at Lionel Messi, who is probably the best in the world at getting kicked, getting up and getting on with it and continually producing magic all the time. “I am not in any way comparing him to Lionel Messi but I am saying we hope the way he gets up after he has been kicked is the way Adnan continues to behave.” Moyes did confuse the issue slightly when he was asked to clarify his comments. “It is not a case of asking for protection,” he said. “We are just saying that somewhere along the line, people will need to let the boy, if he is going to keep playing in the fashion and style we want, he is going to have to get some protection from it. “But we will never ask for any. “It is up to the referees to do what they think is right.” Press Associationlast_img read more

Continue reading

Hull deny Long deal in place

first_img Long was close to signing for the Tigers on transfer deadline day in September, arriving at the club’s training ground via private jet from Dublin after an offer was accepted by the Baggies. But the Midlands club pulled the plug when they failed to secure a deal for Chelsea’s Romelu Lukaku, who instead opted for a loan at Everton. Hull boss Steve Bruce has not hidden his ongoing interest in the Republic of Ireland forward but reports that an agreement had been reached and a medical was due on Thursday appear wide of the mark. An official statement read: “Contrary to reports in the media this morning, the club confirms that it has not reached any agreement with West Bromwich Albion over the transfer of striker Shane Long, and as such will not be conducting a medical with the player today.” Hull have denied reaching agreement with West Brom on a deal for striker Shane Long.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Continue reading

Hard work starts now for McGeady

first_imgEverton manager Roberto Martinez may have been interested in Aiden McGeady for over a year but the Republic of Ireland international knows he will not receive an easy passage into the side. “I think this season already the team has shown they can challenge the top teams and shoot for a top-four place but obviously that is easier said than done,” he added. “The way the manager plays, the style he plays and the mentality he has brought to the team – attacking football – is probably a big change from the season before. “But there are a lot of talented players here and the sky is the limit.” Having spent several years in the Russian wilderness, McGeady is looking forward to being involved in a more high-profile competition. “It is a step up, it is one of the top leagues in the world and everyone wants to play here,” he said. “I can see the standard from watching on the TV but I won’t know until I am involved in it. I just want to be playing and be in that spotlight, in that big league. “Of course it is another challenge for me. The hard work for me has to start now. “It is January and there are only four or five months of the season left but it is a big four or five months for myself.” “He (Martinez) has been quite vocal in that he has been after me for while when he was manager at Wigan and it is good to know a manager likes you so much and that was a big pro for me,” he said. “Also the way he sets his team up and the way it plays can hopefully get the best out of me so I’m looking forward to getting started. “It is a big compliment the fact he has been after me for a while but the hard work starts for me now as I have to try to get myself fit and in the team. “I have only trained for three or four days and I’ve been off since the start of November. “I am probably not ready to be involved in a game but if the manager feels that I will try my best and try to do what I can. “There is big competition for places here so we will see what happens.” McGeady will be in the squad for Monday’s trip to West Brom but will have to settle for a place on the bench at best. He believes he has joined a team capable of securing Champions League football and victory at The Hawthorns would help keep their bid on track. The 27-year-old was close to joining the Spaniard at Wigan last season only for the move to falter but a year on Martinez has finally got his man – albeit for the Toffees. He spent the week at the club’s camp in Tenerife having completed his transfer from Spartak Moscow but having not trained since November, the former Celtic winger knows he has a lot of catching up to do to before he can reward the manager’s faith. Press Associationlast_img read more

Continue reading

Pakistan bowlers to struggle more in England; Left-arm pacer Junaid Khan

first_imgKARACHI: Left-arm pacer Junaid Khan feels Pakistan bowlers are likely to struggle more due to the saliva ban than their English counterparts when the two teams lock horns in a series involving three Tests and as many T20Is in August.Junaid, who isn’t part of the 29-member Pakistan squad, stated England bowlers’ reliance on reverse swing is less in comparison to the Pakistan pacers and that is why the visitors will struggle a bit more. “Both sides will have difficulty if there is no reverse swing on offer due to the saliva ban. However, our bowlers are likely to struggle more. (James) Anderson bowls well with the new ball and his reverse swing is not that good. Similarly, (Stuart) Broad and (Jofra) Archer’s reverse swing is not as effective as our bowlers,” Junaid was quoted as saying by Cricket Pakistan. “Even though Abbas bowls at 125 KPH, he has done well with reverse swing in Asia. Shaheen’s reverse swing may not be as good as Abbas, but it is still alright. “The four Test matches that Naseem has played, he has taken most wickets with reverse swing. Our pacers, particularly the likes of Shaheen, Naseem and Musa will have a difficult time as they do not have the experience of playing in England and are not used to the conditions there.” The first Test between England and Pakistan will be played at the Old Trafford starting August 5 followed by the last two Tests at the Ageas Bowl, which start on August 13 and August 21 respectively. (IANS) Also Watch: #NewsMakers: Dr Satyakam Phukan in conversation with Oineetom Ojahlast_img read more

Continue reading

ICC World Cup Ajinkya Rahane picks two biggest threats for India in World Cup 2019

first_imgAjinkya Rahane last played ODI cricket in January 2018 against South Africa. Rahane rates West Indies and England as the biggest threat for India. Rahane is looking at the county stint to prepare himself for the West Indies tour. For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. “The English conditions will definitely help our bowlers because they know the conditions well having played their recently. They will definitely have to make some adjustments but that won’t be a problem.” Talking about other teams, Rahane picked New Zealand, apart from the West Indies and England, as favourites along with India.”I don’t believe in pinpointing any particular team but England is a good team.New Zealand have done well in ICC tournaments and West Indies is an unpredictable side. They can beat any team on their day,” he said.Rahane, who led the limited overs side at times in the past, said Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s vast experience will be of great help for skipper Kohli in the showpiece.”Virat is a very good leader. Everyone has different qualities. Mahi bhai (Dhoni) has different quality of leadership and Virat will definitely get good support and guidance from Mahi bhai.He is such a senior player and being the wicketkeeper he can set the entire field and guide the bowlers on what length and line to bowl,” he said.Talking about his personal career, Rahane said just like any other cricketer, he also aspired to play in the World Cup.But after being ignored, he has set his sights on his upcoming county stint with Hampshire to fine-tune his batting skills.”I always try to control things rather than thinking about consequences. I always prefer to stay in the present.What is important for me is to play well for Hampshire county. It is my first stint with Hampshire and I am really excited,” said Rahane on the sidelines of the CEAT Cricket Rating Awards here.”Every player wants to represent their country in the World Cup and my dream is also to represent my country and play in the World Cup. But right now my focus is completely on the county stint and I am looking forward to do well for Hampshire and learn many more things.”I had a phone conversation with Rahul bhai (Rahul Dravid) and he told me that he actually learnt a lot playing county cricket. It’s completely a new experience.”Rahane is looking at the county stint to prepare himself for the West Indies tour, which is scheduled after the World Cup.”I had played a couple of Test series over there in 2014 and last summer, so I know English conditions pretty well. But in county you get to learn so many things from your teammates, the culture is different and as an overseas player there will be responsibility. So, it’s all about being positive,” he said.”I am now looking forward to change to red ball cricket from white ball because after that we are going to West Indies for Test series. So my focus is on playing good cricket and staying positive,” Rahane signed off. highlights New Delhi: Picking the West Indies and England as the biggest threat, India’s Test vice-captain Ajinkya Rahane Monday said an “experienced” bowling attack on helpful English conditions could give Virat Kohli’s men edge in the World Cup. With a new round-robin format in place, he said early momentum and consistency will be key to India’s success in the tournament starting in the United Kingdom from May 30.”Overall our team is pretty strong. Our overall package is very good. This time the World Cup will be played in a new format, we will play nine league games, so momentum and consistency will be important,” said Rahane, who couldn’t find a place in the squad. “If you start well you will have to keep up the momentum, you will have to play consistent cricket throughout the tournament. In ICC tournament any team picks up momentum at any time, so we can’t take any team lightly,” added the right-handed batsman, who last played an ODI for India in February 16, 2018 against South Africa in Centurion.The Mumbai batsman said India’s bowling attack will give them edge on helpful English conditions.”Our overall attack, both pace and spin, is very experienced. The good thing is that all the bowlers in our team are wicket-takers and the team which has wicket-taking bowlers, their chances increase. We have bowlers who can pick up wickets in any situation,” he said.last_img read more

Continue reading

Fighting for their future

first_imgAna Mercado was in fifth grade when Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents came knocking on her door. They were looking for the owners of the house she was living in at the time with her parents and siblings, not for Mercado herself. But when she looked at her mom, Mercado saw she had turned pale. She watched her mom hold up a finger to her lips as the agents shouted for them to open up, and stayed quiet until they eventually gave up and went away.“I could see the fear within her,” Mercado said. “She was afraid not just for herself but for her children.”Students and faculty members gather for a meeting of the USC IDEAS Movement, which stands for “Improving Dreams, Education, Access and Success.” During the meeting, students discussed fearful questions of how to protect themselves and their families from the threat of deportation.— Photo by Trevor SochockiMercado didn’t understand at the time that her mom reacted this way because she, her older brother and both of her parents were undocumented. She came to the U.S. from Mexico when she was 3 years old, and had lived in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles for her entire life, so she never felt like her American identity was in question. But for Mercado, now a sophomore majoring in contemporary Latino studies and sociology, the memory of this incident stayed with her as she grew up, applied to college and witnessed the topic of immigration play a larger role in American political discourse. As an undocumented student, Mercado is not alone on campus. The USC Financial Aid Office works with as many as 46 undocumented students, and there could be any number of others who do not voluntarily reveal their status or do not seek aid from the University. However, they are a group that largely lacks resources despite facing unique challenges, from college affordability to the threat of deportation. And with rising anti-immigrant sentiment and open threats of mass deportations from President-elect Donald Trump, many are beginning to fear that the lives they have worked hard to build may be in jeopardy. Facing barriersThe reasons a student may be classified as undocumented are diverse, as are the demographics of the people that fall into this category. They came to the United States from countries as far apart as Mexico, Brazil and Cambodia, for reasons ranging from fleeing gang violence to seeking better economic opportunities. Some of them tried to apply for citizenship, but found that the process could take years to complete. Others were brought here as children, and didn’t learn about their undocumented status until they had already lived in the U.S. for most of their lives. Most undocumented students, however, share a narrative of hardship that encompasses the struggles of all immigrants — adjusting to a new culture, learning the language and missing home — while also facing unique difficulties from a lack of legal documentation. Without a Social Security Number, those who are undocumented cannot legally work, obtain a driver’s license or apply for a loan. This also makes applying to college more difficult. Felipe, a graduate engineering student who declined to use his last name in order to protect his status, immigrated from Brazil when he was 15. He said that when applying to USC, he had questions unique to his situation. Should he apply as an international student? How would he get around having to provide a Social Security Number? None of these had easily accessible answers. “Navigating school is already hard. You come in as a freshman and you don’t know what to do. There’s all these documents you have to fill out,” Felipe said. “Coming as an undocumented [student] is way harder because you cannot just go get the information. You have to meet people and find [your own] way around.” Paying for USC is difficult as well, mainly because undocumented students are not eligible for federal financial aid such as Pell Grants or student loans. The California DREAM Act provides some relief, allowing certain students to apply for in-state public and private assistance, which includes University grants. However, this aid is limited. Though USC promises to meet the full demonstrated need of students eligible for federal funding, this category doesn’t apply to undocumented students, leaving some struggling to fill the gap. “Financial aid at USC is a partnership between the student, the parent, the University and the federal and state government,” said Thomas McWhorter, the dean of financial aid at USC. “In the case of an undocumented student, they’ve never been able to access federal student aid … which is why we are asking other departments and scholarship providers if we can help these students. Clearly we’re making it possible because there are a number of students who are here.” These other methods can include merit funding, special University programs like the Norman Topping Student Aid Fund, scholarships from outside agencies and “self-help” options, including student jobs. Students who qualify under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals act, which applies to undocumented residents who were brought to the United States at a young age after 2007, can receive a temporary Social Security Number, which allows them to work, obtain a driver’s license and apply for loans. Many undocumented students work several jobs at a time in order to make up the difference that state or University aid doesn’t cover. But others are forced to take a leave of absence because they cannot afford to pay, according to one undocumented student who preferred to remain anonymous. Reaching for resourcesIn order to address these challenges, numerous organizations at USC have made a special effort to reach out to undocumented students. While many of the cultural centers on campus are prepared to address these students’ questions, El Centro Chicano is particularly active in this area because of the large number of undocumented students that come from Latin American countries. The center, according to El Centro Director Billy Vela, provides emotional support as well as more concrete resources and connections. “What they can get is a welcome to the Trojan Family, and love and support and excitement … in effect, some normalcy,” Vela said. “After that, we can go somewhat deeper and find out their particular story.” Students can also find that feeling of community through the USC IDEAS Movement, which stands for “Improving Dreams, Education, Access, and Success.” Mercado currently serves as president of this organization, which holds weekly meetings on topics specific to undocumented students. And since last year, they can even find a collection of online resources on the Undergraduate Student Government website, thanks to the efforts of Sen. Sabrina Enriquez. But what many students lack, according to USC Rossier professor Kristan Venegas, is a set of formal resources offered by the University, including specialized financial aid options. Venegas has been helping undocumented students at USC informally for the past decade, passing along information through word of mouth and helping connect students to scholarships or mentors. But she said many students can still slip through the cracks because the University does not provide outreach programs or otherwise acknowledge the existence of its undocumented population. “If you’re smart enough to get into USC, you clearly have the academic potential to make it just as much as any other student next to you,” Venegas said. “To me, what differentiates you is your ability to access aid and other daily needs. If you’re having to work … you might have to slow down your pace.”‘Uncertainty and fear’The need for increased resources has become all the more urgent, Venegas said, in the face of increasingly anti-immigrant rhetoric employed by many individuals and Republican politicians. Most notably, President-elect Donald Trump has called for the mass deportation of all 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. as a central part of his platform. Students have been affected by these statements as well. Mercado said she is concerned by the number of people that openly support Trump on campus. As a result, she has been afraid to talk about her status in public. Others, like Kimberly Alvarado, a sophomore majoring in psychology, have felt the impact of Trump’s call for a special “deportation force” to round up undocumented immigrants on a personal level. Alvarado, who came to the United States from El Salvador when she was 4 years old, said that she fears what will happen to her family and her future if Trump follows through with his promise.“I’ve worked really hard to get where I am, putting all stereotypes and expectations aside,” Alvarado said. “And right now, I feel like I’m not a part of this country though I call it home, [because] all of that can be taken away so soon. My two younger sisters look up to me, and what if I’m not here for them? What if all this work here was for nothing?”Vela, however, is hopeful that the rhetoric employed by Trump and his supporters can serve to unite, rather than divide, the student body at USC. “The election season has brought up a lot of prominence about the discussion,” Vela said. “I think the response to it has been very fierce and very strong and I feel like has really galvanized people who are both undocumented and allies to push even harder for people to take another look at the community.”Moving forwardMore resources have become available to undocumented students at USC over the past few years. IDEAS was founded in 2011, and USG’s Undocumented Resource Guide was created last year. But students such as Mercado believe that more work needs to be done, starting with formal recognition by the University. “I feel like there’s a lot [USC administrators] can do, especially now,” Mercado said. “They speak about ‘diversity’ and providing assistance to all these different cultures, and yet they haven’t done much [for undocumented students]. For one, they need to provide legal assistance — we need to have someone here on campus that we can go to to ask our questions, explain our concerns and get some sort of guidance.” Others, such as Enriquez, have fought to create an Undocumented Resource Center, a model that already exists in the University of California system. Plans to implement such a center were included in the Campus Climate Resolution that USG passed in 2015, but the University has yet to act on them. Administrators also have not yet agreed to declare USC a sanctuary for undocumented students, despite an online petition that has garnered over 4,700 signatures from students, faculty and alumni as of Tuesday. And until they do, Mercado said that the responsibility falls on undocumented students to defend the lives they have built in the U.S. in the face of legal and financial threats.“I feel like the biggest thing is learning,” Mercado said. “Learning about the laws, ways to protect ourselves, gaining that knowledge of everything we need to ensure that we are ready to fight if we have to, that we’re prepared to defend ourselves against whatever comes.”last_img read more

Continue reading