Golden Image Festivities Begin

first_imgActivities marking this year’s Golden Image Award have begun with the official launch of the Media Publicity and Programs. The launch was held at the headquarters of the Liberia Crusaders for Peace.The Golden Image Award (GIA) was founded in September 2010 to serve as a face for Liberia and to recognize and appreciate those nations, organizations and individuals who, against all odds put in their time and resources to ensure that Liberia as a nation and people be restored through their sacrifices and contributions during and after the 14years of upheaval and corruption in Liberia.The GIA is premised on 2 key rationales — to support the Government of the Republic of Liberia through innovative activities to rebuild Liberia’s image after 14years of devastating civil crisis, and to honor and recognize individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the peace process in Liberia including those who have significantly impacted their communities, the lives of other people but were unnoticed.According to Ambassador Juli Endee, Executive Director and Founder of Liberia Crusaders for Peace (LCP), the GIA is designed to promote development and Liberia’s Independence Day Celebration.It aspires to maintain the precedence every year in the hope of supporting national leadership to sustain the peace and elicit the confidence of the international community with Government and increase investment in Liberia’s economy.“This year GIA program will be followed by ground breaking ceremony for a monument in Bomi county, recognize Liberians and other nationals who have successfully impacted the lives of Liberia through continuous sacrifices and public services while promoting peace; support and motivate humanitarians in and around the world, showcase the talents of Liberians and improve capacity building means and enhance their potentials for future challenges,” Ms. Endee underscored.GIA will also focus on strengthening Liberia’s social and economic profile through arts and culture followed by exhibition of Liberia’s arts and craft.”Giving special remarks at   the ceremony, District #4 Representative Henry Fahnbulleh promised to work with the team of the GIA in order to take Liberia’s image to another level by making Liberia compete with its counter parts. Discussing the Image of Liberia, Hon. Fahnbulleh said the image of Liberia focuses on the country and its people, “ Liberia has gone far but not at the right place yet , infrastructure wise we are nothing but  we will stand up for an image  that will be preferred by the  future of our people.”He further indicated that Liberians are industrious people and its image needs to be changed, stating that in order for Liberia’s image to remain, the Sande and Poro society  must not be remove because it will help to hold the image  and culture of Liberia.“It’s the Sande and Poro societies that make us where we are today, we got better training, both our sisters and brothers from the two societies. So, these societies must survive forever.” Hon. Fahnbulleh assured.For his part, the Superintendent of Bomi County pledged his support to the GIA program and promised to give a parcel of land where the monument will be built to represent the image of the country.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Emery forces long-serving Wilshere to seek new pastures

first_img0Shares0000Jack Wilshere has scored 14 goals in his 197 appearances since making his debut for Arsenal in 2008 © AFP/File / Ben StansallLONDON, United Kingdom, Jun 20 – England midfielder Jack Wilshere is to end almost two decades at Arsenal and leave on a free transfer after being told by manager Unia Emery he would not be a first choice next season.The 26-year-old — scorer of 14 goals in his 197 appearances since making his debut for ‘The Gunners’ in 2008 — said he had offered to take a pay cut, which persuaded former manager Arsene Wenger to recommend he be awarded a new contract. However, Emery told the injury-prone Wilshere — who missed out on making the World Cup squad after his form faltered towards the end of the season — even with that he would not be prominent in his planning for next season.“Following a number of extensive conversations with those at the club, and in particular a recent meeting with the new manager Unai Emery, I felt that I was ultimately left with little choice but to make the decision that I have due to purely footballing reasons,” he said in a post on Instagram.“Following my meeting with the new manager I was made aware that although the reduced contract offer remained, it was made clear to me that my playing time would be significantly reduced should I decide to stay.”Wilshere, who won the last of his 34 caps in the humiliating loss to Iceland at Euro 2016, said he would take his time deciding who he would play for next.Clubs such as Everton, Southampton and Crystal Palace — managed by former England handler Roy Hodgson — are reported to have shown an interest of late.“I’ll now be taking the time necessary to consider my options before deciding on the next stage of my career,” sad Wlshere.“There will be the opportunity to talk properly when the time is right but for now I would just like to thank everyone at the club for everything over the past 17 years.“In particular Arsene Wenger and his staff, all of my team-mates over the years, everyone at the academy for helping me fulfil my dream and of course the fans, who I have always shared such a special relationship with.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Tottenham, Liverpool and Manchester United in fight for Bayern attacker

first_imgTottenham, Liverpool and Manchester United will be challenged by German side Schalke 04 in the race to sign Xherdan Shaqiri this winter.The Swiss ace has struggled to make his mark at Bayern Munich and seemed set for a Premier League switch this summer.The former Basel midfielder was persuaded to stay by Pep Guardiola, but it is expected there could now be movement in January and new Schalke boss Roberto Di Matteo wants to steal a march on his former Premier League opponents.German newspaper Bild quote Shaqiri as saying: “In the winter we will get together again and see. But the club has the final say.” Xherdan Shaqiri 1last_img read more

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Griffith Park’s natural beauty offers refuge at city’s center

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2“When you go to Griffith Park, everybody has something in common, everybody becomes friendlier with each other. We become a common city.” From its heights above Los Angeles, Griffith Park offers sweeping views of a commonly shared metropolis. On the eastern edge of the Santa Monica Mountains, the park’s 4,100 acres – maintained by 120 city workers – offers respite for 10 million visitors a year. Joggers hit their stride. Bicyclists spin their wheels. Duffers get in their licks. Couples hold hands. A lone flutist plays on a distant glade. And America’s largest urban hike club assembles three times a week for a two-hour sundown trek. “Are you ready to hike?” shouted Alvarado, leader of the Sierra Club Angeles Chapter Griffith Park Section, during a recent evening hike above the historic Griffith Park Merry-Go-Round. “Yes!” barked a hundred waiting regulars. “OK, that sounds like music to my ears.” With that, hikers from across Los Angeles hoofed it over sage-covered hills gifted to the city by Col. Griffith J. Griffith in 1896. Few knew of the dapper Welshman who’d once owned Rancho Los Feliz, the former Spanish land grant that would become known as Griffith Park. Few knew of the colonel’s aim: to edify residents of every race and creed via a sunlit riverfront park. “It must be made a place of recreation and rest for the masses, a resort for the rank and file, for the plain people,” Griffith said to mark the occasion. “I consider it my obligation to make Los Angeles a happier, cleaner, and finer city.” And few knew of the portly gentleman who, after a sensational trial, would serve two years in prison for shooting his society wife in the eye. As Griffith had fretted over the future of his park, so have others. Last year, a consultant floated a draft Griffith Park master plan with notions of aerial tramways, parking garages, a mountain hostel and an L.A. River “pleasure pier.” A more hands-off vision will soon be submitted by a working group of nearby residents and stakeholders. “The biggest single long-range threat to the park is overdevelopment,” said Mike Eberts, author of “Griffith Park: A Centennial History,” and a frequent hiker in the park. “I think the open space in the park should take priority – once the land is developed, you don’t get it back.” Hikers traipse past mustard and sticky monkey flowers. Past Amir’s Garden, with its blooming pink geraniums. Past historic Bee Rock and over toilsome Cardiac Hill. As the sun sets, the sage becomes fragrant as the lights of the city begin to flicker far, far below. “It’s beautiful,” exclaimed Ana Montenegro, 48, of Burbank. “All the trees. It’s relaxing. The views. The city lights.” “What a great way to get rid of stress,” said hike leader Theresa Michaels, an agent with Windermere Burbank. “I’m a Realtor and I completely forget about it huffing and puffing up here.” Each week, Tovah Sands looks forward to heading directly from her job in Northridge to the heights of Griffith Park. “I love it,” said Sands, of Woodland Hills, taking a deep breath at the top of a hill. “Isn’t it gorgeous? It’s the most beautiful thing. “This is the most important part of Los Angeles.” dana.bartholomew@dailynews.com (818) 713-3730160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! For the true heart of Los Angeles, look no farther than Griffith Park. From its lush golf courses to its historic Greek Theatre and Griffith Observatory, from its L.A. Zoo to its equestrian and hiking trails – Westsiders mingle with east Angelenos as Valley denizens join those from downtown. For more than a century, the nation’s largest municipal wildland park has served to unite Angelenos. “Everybody talks about Central Park in New York, (but) Griffith Park is a beautiful natural monument … better than any park in the world,” said Louis Alvarado, honorary mayor of Griffith Park. last_img read more

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DD Pets: Getting your dog accustomed to the vet

first_imgGoing to the vet can be scary for lots of dogs more often than not this is due to improper training from a young age. When you get young puppy you should hand feed them while touching and feeling different parts of their body. Keep the food in a closed hand so your puppy can smell the food each time you touch a body part your hand should open and you should reward your puppy. If Possible do this on top of a table and progress by using multiple family members or friends.When going to the vet ask permission that you practice this while the examination of your puppy takes place. This will create positive associations with getting handled by a veterinarian. Make sure you go for regular checkups with your puppy every six months to keep them in practice. Do you have an older dog that panics going it the vet?Don’t worry it’s not a lost cause. Practice the above at home and make regular trips to the veterinary car park do this several times until you see that your dog is happy to get out of the car. Once you have established this you should then progress to the waiting area.If your dog is making good progress both at home and around the veterinary surgery you should then go for a check up just to practice with your dog. For older dogs this takes time. Practice from a young age can prevent anxiety, fear, and aggression and can make your dog love going to the vet. You should follow these steps on a regular basis even if you don’t have a vet appointment or routine vaccination coming up. Don’t wait for a problem to occur before beginning training as its always much easier to prevent rather than having to intervene.If you would like to join get started in training with your puppy then why not join puppy class. Every Sunday at 11am – 12pm. Contact Ray on 0864468313.You can also get in contact through facebook on the k9academy facebook pageDD Pets: Getting your dog accustomed to the vet was last modified: October 31st, 2016 by Ray BreslinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DD PetsdogsdonegalK9 ACADEMYvetslast_img read more

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Fortuna overcomes five-turnover night to claim 33-20 win over McKinleyville

first_imgFORTUNA >> At times Friday night, the Huskies proved to be their own worst enemy.But when they did get the ball rolling and not put it on the turf, they looked like a well-oiled machine on offense.Junior running back Bailey Foley ran for 141 yards and two touchdowns as Fortuna was able to overcome five turnovers and claim a 33-20 win over McKinleyville on homecoming night in the Friendly City, the Huskies’ first home victory of 2016.“After last week, we wanted to play. And we did at times, …last_img read more

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The Flying Giraffe and Other Fossil Stories of Extinct Reptiles

first_imgImagine a giraffe leaping into the air and flying off. That’s what this giant pterosaur was like. Other interpretations about extinct reptiles are not so certain.Flying GiraffeA pterosaur as tall as a bull giraffe has been found in Mongolia. Fox News calls it a “plane size reptile.” National Geographic‘s headline reads, “Ancient Winged Terror Was One of the Largest Animals to Fly.” Not even a California condor could stand up to this flyer. Standing 18 feet high, with a 32-foot wingspan, this specimen rivals the largest pterosaurs ever discovered. Giant pterosaurs must have traveled far, because they have been found on opposite sides of the globe. This specimen was found in Mongolia; Quetzalcoatlus was found in Texas; another giant in Romania.“Pterosaurs appear very suddenly in the fossil record, and their ancestry is very poorly understood.”Neither article discusses ancestors of these monsters, because none are known. Like many creatures in the fossil record, they appear abruptly without missing links. A page from the University of Bristol about the pterosaur fossil record says, “Pterosaurs appear very suddenly in the fossil record, and their ancestry is very poorly understood.”Flying reptiles have no connection, either, to the assumed dinosaur ancestors of birds. Powered flight requires the whole organism be adapted for that function: light weight, adaptations to the skeleton, the muscles, the wings, the digestive system, and everything else. Accounting for the origin of powered flight once by chance would be a near miracle, but evolutionists have to explain it four times: in insects, reptiles, birds and bats. Each of these groups flies (or flew) superbly well.Bandit Pre-BirdFor this reason, it seems underwhelming to focus on shading patterns of melanin on a supposed “feathered dinosaur” that evolutionists believe was on the line to birds. When Current Biology reported possible melanin shades in the fuzz on Sinosauropteryx (Chinese lizard with wings), found in the Jehol region of China, it would have been nice to see some mention of flying, flight, or wings. Instead, the open-access paper danced around the interpretation of the fuzz surrounding parts of the creature’s body, saying, “Each specimen shows extensive preservation of dark, presumably organically preserved fibers identified as feathers/feather homologs in distinct areas of the animal.” The authors dispute the interpretation that the fuzz is flayed skin collagen, but only refers to another paper about that.Reporters are not so bashful about the fuzz, calling the creature a “feathered dinosaur” openly without mentioning anything about interpretation. The artwork, however, clearly shows this animal was not ready for takeoff. Its diminutive forearms and long, thick tail made it a jumper at best, not a powered flyer. And whatever one wants to call “feathers” looks more like hair or fuzz. Live Science‘s coverage was less brazen than the press office at University of Bristol, which went out of its way to mention similarities this running reptile had with birds. At Creation.com, though, Jonathan Sarfati finds a lot more evidence in Sinosauropteryx to support a watery burial in a flood than a hopeful monster trying to become a bird.Those Puny Arms on T. RexSpeaking of diminutive forearms, National Geographic presented the idea that the tiny arms on T. Rex were effective slashing and grasping tools, not vestigial organs. Steven Stanley made this argument at a meeting of the Geological Society of America. Not everyone was convinced, however. A different idea proposed recently is that the arms diminished as a tradeoff to allow room for powerful neck muscles supporting the head. Another theory is that the arms were proportionally longer and functional in youth, but less so in adulthood.Soft Tissue SkepticismAnother skeptic of dinosaur soft tissue, this one Evan Thomas Saitta (also from the University of Bristol), argues in The Conversation that supposed blood vessels and red blood cells found in some dinosaur bones are really due to contamination or biofilms. He takes a couple of swipes at creationists along the way:One peculiarity of these widely publicised reports is the inevitable pseudo-scientific discourse that tends to follow. Creationists love such claims of unstable, original molecules in dinosaur fossils – and use them to back up their belief in a “young Earth”. The scientists in question retort that such hijacking of their work fails to comprehend the mechanisms of preservation….As wrong as creationists are about the age of the Earth and of the mineral components of dinosaur bones, they may actually be correct in their suspicion about some of the organic materials we find within them. The less sensational truth may be that in some cases, the organic material inside ancient fossil bones may simply be formed from recent microbial infections.Saitta also offends Catholics in his ‘conversation’ by referring to the natural transformation of biofilm into organic-like structures as a form of ‘transubstantiation.’ But he has a lot of reports in peer-reviewed journals to contradict these days. Reports of soft tissue from many different kinds of animals over the whole geologic column continue to pour in. We expect Mary Schweitzer, a figurehead of dinosaur soft tissue finds, will have some rebuttal to Saitta’s arguments.Myth of the Dinosaur-Killing AsteroidLike ‘feathered dinosaur’ claims that are treated as fact, the ‘dinosaur-killing asteroid’ story has taken on the air of accepted myth. It shows up even in unrelated subjects. Astrobiology Magazine links it to climate change without explaining how many delicate animals survived the impact. It must be remembered that not all dinosaurs were large. Some were the size of chickens, but chickens and other small reptiles survived. Not a single dinosaur, pterosaur or marine reptile made it through the extinction, according to evolution. How could a single impact on one side of the world have such a selective effect?The University of Warwick used the asteroid myth on an unrelated story about a promising cancer treatment using iridium. “Cancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs,” the article on Science Daily begins. No support necessary; everyone knows to bow down. Cancer patients may not care where the iridium comes from if it helps them live.Dinosaurs are fun to learn about when you first learn to separate fact from interpretation. Perhaps the most significant fact to keep in mind is this: no complex system made up of a hierarchy of systems working together for function happens without intelligent design. Dinosaurs and pterosaurs were highly successful, extremely complex creatures, with circulatory systems, nervous systems, digestive systems, reproductive systems, sensory systems, and brains allowing them to hunt, migrate, adapt to extremes of climate, and participate in a complex web of life. Pterosaurs were also masters of powered flight, independently of four unrelated groups (insects, birds, and bats) that also possessed everything needed to fly. “You don’t just partly fly,” Paul Nelson quipped in Flight: The Genius of Birds. Which gives us an opportunity to introduce (with appreciation) J. Beverly Greene’s latest cartoon specially drawn for Creation-Evolution Headlines, illustrating a famous remark by Sir Fred Hoyle about the theory of evolution.Artwork by J. Beverly Greene for CEH. All rights reserved. (Visited 530 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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SA teen wins at tech awards

first_img12 July 2007Johannesburg teenager Siyabulela Xuza won two top awards at the 58th Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Albuquerque, New Mexico in May for developing a safe and cheaper form of rocket fuel.Xuza, a Grade 12 pupil from St John’s College in Johannesburg won the “Best of Category” award and a “First Award” in the energy and transportation sector with his project, “African Space: Fueling Africa’s quest to space”In addition, the New Mexico Oil and Gas Company gave him US$8000 (about R55 000), while he also received a high performance laptop from Intel and the world-renowned Massachusetts Institute of Technology.“I was also part of the South African team, which, second to the US, won most grand awards at the fair,” he says.According to Intel’s website, the fair is the world’s biggest student science event, drawing more than 1 500 students from 52 countries.“I felt honoured to represent South Africa at such an event. We can basically compete at the same level or even better than overseas countries, despite the limited resources we have,” he says, sending a strong message to those he says still undermine South Africa’s potential in the field of science.The category judges were impressed by his insight and thorough knowledge of all aspects of his project. “I can’t speak for the judges, but I think they were impressed by the diligence that led up to the project and the passion I have for [it].”ScholarshipAccording to Xuza, a scholarship learner from Umtata in the Eastern Cape, accidents are a major problem for the aerospace industry, which is why he developed a safer rocket fuel.And, after hearing that governments spend millions on going to space instead of pouring it into initiatives like HIV/Aids prevention, he thought of a cheaper way of going to space.“What makes the fuel cheaper and safer are the ingredients that go into making it,” he says, noting that he cannot reveal the process or the ingredients for “security reasons”.Known among his friends as just Siya, Xuza emphasises that he does not want to take all the credit for the project. “I am very grateful for the support I got from my mentors – Aerospace Research based in Veeriniging and Richard Nakka, an amateur rocket scientist.”Xuza’s journey to the US started last September, when he was awarded a gold medal for his project African Space – Fuelling Africa’s Quest to Space at the Eskom National Science Expo. He also won the Dr Derek Gray Memorial Award for the most prestigious project in South Africa.These awards resulted in an invitation to the international Youth Science Fair in Sweden in December 2006, where he presented his project to the king and queen of that country and attended a Nobel Prize ceremony in Stockholm.Early interestHis interest in aeronautics began at an early age, when he put a theory he had learned in class into practice by building rockets in his mom’s kitchen.However, it was only when he won a gold medal at the President’s Awards for Youth Empowerment Trust in October last year that he took his hobby to the next level.“I was always interested in rockets and my award leader, Sean Wilson from St John’s College, suggested that I use my hobby as a part of the skills segment.”With the award to his name, he was able to canvass organisations to help him get the parts to build a rocket, which took eight months. It was during this process, he noted, that he developed a safer and cheaper rocket fuel.Xuza has achieved what many of his peers dream of – among others, he has been awarded his academic colours for maintaining an aggregate of 75% in exams for three consecutive terms, and he has broken South Africa’s amateur high-powered altitude record by a teenager for launching a rocket 800 metres into the air at a site in Sasolburg, in Free State.After completing school, he intends to study chemical engineering and hopes to encourage other youngsters to become more interested in science.“I want to use science for the betterment of our society, coming up with solutions to the problems we are facing. The greatest reward would be to see other students getting into the science field.”“Kids like Siya come once in 20 years,” says St John’s College’s marketing director, Toni Williams.But Xuza refuses to be called a special or extraordinary teenager. “Except being curious, questioning everything, I am just a normal teenager,” he says.Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

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Do Europeans Make Better Windows Than We Do?

first_imgIt should come as no surprise that Europe, home of the Passivhaus standard, produces some outstanding windows. Some builders of high-efficiency houses in North America turn to European window manufacturers for their glazing, even though some U.S. and Canadian producers also offer high-performance products of their own.Is there a way to compare the performance data on windows from these two sources? That’s what Steve Young, now planning a Passive House in Climate Zone 5, would like to know.“I have read many blogs and Q&A pages from this web site and I am still somewhat confused about European windows,” Young writes in Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor.First, he says, there are the different testing standards between North American and European manufacturers, which makes Young wonder how he should view data on U-factors, solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), and visible transmittance (VT).“So should I pretty much ignore the U-factors, if I am looking at the ‘best’ glass and frames and compare the SHGC and VT only?” he asks. “The Optiwin figures (SHGC 0.52) seem to beat anything that Thermotech Fiberglass has (SHGC 0.42), or is that somehow measured differently in Europe, too? Transmittance has to be measured the same?”Young points out that European windows don’t have nailing flanges like North American windows, and that while fiberglass windows are available on this side of the Atlantic, they don’t seem to be available from European makers. GREEN PRODUCT GUIDE How can the two be compared?That’s the subject of this month’s Q&A Spotlight. Our expert’s opinionHere’s what GBA technical director Peter Yost has to say on this issue:Alex Wilson wrote a great piece for BuildingGreen on European windows for Passive House. And Mike Duclos, a Passive House consultant and energy rater who deals with differences in European and North American windows all the time, reminded me that the wider frames of European windows also make “over-insulation” easier.Our industry needs to address these differences at the international level. But the real problem of comparing North American and European windows runs pretty deep. For years, scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been lobbying the International Standards Organization (ISO) to adopt a single set of standards for the testing and computer simulation of window performance. And yet two very different standards (ISO 15099 and ISO 10292) are still being developed and pursued. This is NOT how global commerce is supposed to work, especially when less and less actual testing of windows is being conducted and more and more modeling is.For more information on issues with ISO window standards development, see these two references:“Discrepancies Between ISO Window Simulation Standards” by Dr. Charlie Curcija, University of Massachusetts – Amherst, November 23, 2005. (Charlie Curcija is now a senior scientist with LBNL, and they will soon be posting this reference on the LBNL website). This paper references the work cited below.CENT/TC89/WG7 ad hoc ISO 15099: “Comparison of standards on thermal, solar and/or light properties of windows and window components” by Dick van Dijk, Delft, The Netherlands. Testing protocols are differentDon’t ignore published European U-factors, says GBA senior editor Martin Holladay — just keep in mind the fact that you can’t compare them directly to those published in North America. “Lower is still better than higher,” he writes.In the window industry, adds Greg Smith, “it’s something of a given (depending on source, of course) that translated European U-factors are at least 10% ‘better’ than the equivalent NFRC [National Fenestration Rating Council] rating. Some folks will suggest the ‘advantage’ is closer to 20% when you start getting down into the low teens and better.”One factor is how the testing calculations are actually made, Smith says. “The lower delta-T used for European calculations versus the greater delta-T used for [North American] U-factor calculations is an ‘advantage’ for European designers resulting in the apparent U-factor advantage of the European glass package/window,” he writes. As Smith’s subsequent comments made clear, when a European manufacturer reports a lower (that is, better) U-factor than a North American manufacturer, the lower number doesn’t necessarily indicate that the European window will perform better than the North American window.“Additionally, European windows are more likely to be fabricated with a thicker glass package (heavier glass with wider airspace) than are North American window makers,” Smith adds.Finally, European manufacturers are more likely to use low-iron glass in high-performance windows rather than the conventional float glass used by North American manufacturers, Smith says. The European ‘secret sauce’Having the details spelled out is helpful to Jesse Thompson, who says it “never smelled right” to him that European manufacturers had some “secret sauce” giving them an edge.“Especially when they seem to be all multinational corporations selling products across the globe,” Thompson says. “It seems to all come down to good old-fashioned sales demand, regulation, and market movement.”In response, Eliason notes: “Ah, but there is a secret sauce of sorts.” European calculations favor thicker spacing between panes, whereas the NFRC calculations favor thinner ones. And the Europeans seem to have figured out how to make low-iron glass without it costing too much.“We had it [low-iron glass] priced out by two North American [manufacturers] and the increase in price was phenomenal,” he says. “With the EU Passive House windows we imported, there was no cost increase for the ultra high SHGC glass. In actuality, it was a cost decrease — as the windows were less expensive than the North American windows we would have otherwise used, and then because of the high SHGC, we were able to shed a few inches of insulation as well.” Do European windows actually perform better?Mike Eliason argues that while there are “slight differences” in how U-factors are calculated, “the numbers don’t appear to be off by a significant factor.”More important is the apparent difference in performance. European makers “have been pushed by both policy and demand” for glazing with high solar heat gain coefficients and very lower U-factors, Eliason writes. As a result, there are some “spectacular glazing units” available from European makers, particularly from companies such as Glas Trösch and Guardian.“We’d love to use [North American] windows and glass manufactured in North America for the PH [Passivhaus] houses we’re working on,” he says, “but no one seems willing to step up to the plate and produce what we can get from EU for cost, performance and quality.”“In our research, the glass in North America isn’t quite up to par with what’s being produced in the EU,” he says, “even if you take a 10% difference based on the alternative means of calculating U-factors.” Green Basics: Windows, Glass Ratings and InstallationPassivhaus Windows Study Shows That Expensive Windows Yield Meager Energy ReturnsAll About Glazing OptionsChoosing Triple-Glazed WindowsDo Europeans Really Make the Best Windows? Glass packages are ‘pretty much identical’But Smith doesn’t agree. “If we do an apples to apples comparison, then glass packages are going to be pretty much identical whether the glass package is from North America or Europe,” he writes. The use of thicker, low-iron glass and wider air spaces gives European glass the “slight performance edge” that Eliason cites in a number of examples, but that’s not due to any technological advantages, he says.“When comparing European and North American glass packages using the same basic glass substrate, comparable (high solar heat gain, low solar heat gain, etc.) low-e coatings, and keeping air space depth and fill consistent, you aren’t going to have any real differences in energy performance, no matter where the glass package was produced,” Smith says.“Bottom line is that glass is glass, doesn’t matter if it is floated in Europe or in North America (just as long as it’s low-iron versus low-iron or standard soda-lime float versus standard soda-lime float). European argon and North American argon come from the same source no matter where the IGU comes from. Low-e coatings are pretty amazing — both application and performance — but there is no one in either Europe or North America who has cornered the market on some new miraculous low-e coating technology.”What’s really different, he says, is a “matter of what people are demanding from window suppliers and what the window suppliers want from their glass suppliers. We might spell the difference between Europe and North America as ‘education.’ ” RELATED ARTICLES GBA Product Guide: Windowslast_img read more

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Rajasthan BJP MP Harish Chandra Meena joins Congress

first_imgRajasthan BJP MP Harish Chandra Meena joined the Congress on November 14. Mr. Harish Chandra Meena, a former DGP, joined the Congress in the presence of former Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot, Rajasthan Pradesh Congress Committee chief Sachin Pilot and AICC’s State in-charge Avinash Pande.“I am happy that Harish Meena has decided to join the Congress in such times. I welcome him in the Congress fold,” Mr. Gehlot said at a press conference about Mr. Harish Chandra Meena who had served as DGP under him.In 2014, Mr. Harish Chandra Meena defeated his elder brother and senior Congress leader Namonarain Meena from the Dausa Lok Sabha seat. Mr. Namonarain Meena came third in the contest.Mr. Harish Chandra Meena defeated his nearest rival Kirori Lal Meena, who was then a candidate of National People’s Party by a margin of 45,404 votes. Mr. Kirori Lal Meena is now a BJP Rajya Sabha MP.Mr. Kirori Lal Meena said Mr. Harish Chandra Meena joining the Congress will have no impact on tribal votes in Dausa and its nearby regions in the State polls in December. “There will be no impact. People know who is an opportunist and an opportunist can go anywhere.”Congress leader and Sapotara MLA Ramesh Meena, said though his party had given a lot to the family of Mr. Namonarain Meena, his brother Mr. Harish Chandra Meena joined the BJP in 2014. “Harish Meena has returned home,” said the Deputy Leader of Opposition in the Rajasthan Assembly. Mr. Ramesh Meena claimed that a few more BJP rebel leaders would join the Congress.Elections to the 200-member Rajasthan Assembly will be held on December 7.last_img read more

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