NFL Teams Increasingly Hang on to Their Star Draftees

Where will the players drafted by the NFL over the past few days do the bulk of their professional work? If trends in the past two decades continue, the answer is with the team that drafted them.For the piece I wrote last week on comparing consecutive years of the NFL draft, I downloaded year-by-year draft data from Pro-Football-Reference. The site includes, for each player in each year, his weighted career Approximate Value, a modified form of the site’s Approximate Value metric. It also includes the amount of the player’s weighted career value accrued for the team that drafted him.For each draft from 1970 to 2013, I summed the career value accrued for drafting teams by the first 222 players selected — 222, because that’s the lowest number of draft picks during the period, in 1994. Then I divided that by the overall career value of the year’s drafted players.From the AFL-NFL merger in 1970 to 1981, drafting teams’ share of value kept climbing, to a high of 88 percent in 1981. Then the share started to fall, precipitously as the effects of free agency in 1993 started to kick in in players’ later years. Teams’ share of their drafted players’ career value was just 56 percent for those picked in the first offseason of free agency.At the dawn of free agency, some analysts feared this trend would continue unabated. “Say goodbye to dynasties and continuity,” Alan Greenberg wrote in the Hartford Courant 20 years ago this month. “Now everyone’s a raider. If the salary cap won’t let you pay ’em, you’ll lose ’em. If they’re no good, dump ’em and steal somebody else’s guys. What uniforms should players wear on their trading cards? How about blank?”And some have perceived that the trend has continued unabated. “Fans are increasingly rooting for the decals on their team’s helmets and against the decals on the other teams’ helmets,” Elliot Harrison wrote on NFL.com last year. “The truest loyalty in the player-fan relationship is of the fantasy football variety. You can thank free agency for that.”But the reality has been different. Right after that nadir in 1993, teams’ share of their drafted players’ career value rose sharply, to 64 percent the next year and 69 percent in 1995. It remained in the high 60s nearly every year afterward. The results are similar when looking at all of a draft’s picks, not just its first 222.The downside to this approach is it can’t be updated all the way to the present. Drafted players are more likely to play for their drafting team in their first seasons in the league, before becoming eligible for free agency. So while teams’ share climbed to 86 percent in 2009 and 98 percent last year, those percentages are sure to fall.To approximate the trend in recent years, I isolated the analysis only to players who were no longer active last season. And among that group, teams kept getting a higher share of their drafted players’ value — above 70 percent every year until 2005, when retired players’ share of drafts’ value starts getting so low that the results aren’t meaningful. Here’s one piece of anecdotal evidence: Many of the most valuable players drafted since then remain with their drafting team, such as Aaron Rodgers, Frank Gore, Jahri Evans, Haloti Ngata, Patrick Willis and Adrian Peterson.What this all means is up for further analysis and debate. Maybe teams have gotten better at identifying their drafted talent before rookie contracts are up. Maybe they’ve come to value continuity in their rosters, for on-field benefits and for fan support. Perhaps players value continuity for the same reasons. Maybe the 2011 collective-bargaining agreement has changed things for some of the more-recent draft classes.Whatever the explanation, it’s clear that free agency has had a far bigger impact on players’ freedom to change teams than it has on the uniforms shown on trading cards. read more

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RGIII Falling Out of Good Graces of Many Redskins

Want to learn how tough Robert Griffin III is? How he handles the next week, amid criticism and mounting calls for backup Kirk Cousins, will go a long way to determining that critical question for the Washington Redskins’ quarterback.In just two weeks, Griffin–the darling of D.C., if not the NFL after a thrilling rookie season–has learned how quickly fans can turn on you when you do not produce. Following a second straight sorry start to games, both losses, the message boards and sports talk shows in D.C. are flooded with calls for Griffin to sit down until healthy in place of his backup, Cousins.Comments like, “Cousins gives us the best chance to win,” and “Robert Griffin is not the same guy. . . yet. He’s not that guy.”The case against Griffin is tangible. The Redskins fell behind significantly in the season-opening loss to the Philadelphia Eagles and trailed the Green Bay Packers 24-0 in Sunday’s 38-20 loss on the road. In each case, Griffin looked timid in his throwing motion, favoring his surgically repaired knee that kept him sidelined all of the preseason.“If I’ve got to do a little bit more to clean up that sloppiness,” he said Sunday, “then I’ll do it. . . I don’t point the finger at anybody else. Whatever goes on on that field, I’m responsible for that.”He added: “I’m not afraid to sit here and say, ‘Put that on my shoulders,’ ” Griffin said. “I’ll take that. We didn’t start fast because of me.”What made Griffin RGIII was his ability to escape the pocket with his mobility and gain yards as a runner, making him a double threat that crossed up defenses last season. By design or by choice, Griffin hardly uses his legs as an asset, making him predictable and easier to defend. The results have been the Redskins falling behind to insurmountable deficits.Hence, many are left to wonder if Griffin truly is healthy enough to lead the team at this point. He can point to the second half numbers as proof of his effectiveness. But most of the respectable final number he posted came when the opponents went into the so-called prevent defense, backing off and allowing receivers to catch the ball in front of them.The consensus is that Griffin is not healthy enough to run and is scared to run because of his knee, and it has stifled the offense. To wit: he rushed 8 1/2 times a game last season. In the two games this year, he has run the ball just four times a game.In 2012, Griffin averaged 8½ rushes in games he started and finished. He has averaged four runs a game. And his absence as a running possibility minimizes the team’s offensive creativity.“I’m not just going to run just to show people that I’m back,” Griffin said Sunday. “I think that’s stupid.”It’s not viable that he is the same player when he passes 49 times as he did Sunday and 40 the opening week.For sure, not playing in the preseason has hurt; Griffin looks more rusty than anything else. But the health concerns are legitimate. His passing motion is muted–he does not step through the throwing motion to get the proper velocity on the ball.Still, the cries for Cousins are pointless; Griffin is the man and will be, barring injury. It’s just a matter of when he gets more confidence in his ability to run and plant on the knee as he passes that will determine when his legion of fans return en masse. read more

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Can The Minnesota Wild Recover From Their LateSeason Swoon

The NHL playoffs begin today, but the Minnesota Wild and their fan base probably wish it were still February. Back then, the Wild had the second-most points in the NHL, they’d scored the fourth-most goals in the NHL, goalie Devan Dubnyk was the clear favorite for the Vezina trophy (given to the league’s top goaltender), and they were generally considered to be among the favorites to emerge out of the perennially competitive Western Conference. But once the calendar flipped to March, Minnesota headed in a decidedly different direction.In their 16 games last month, the Wild earned just 10 out of a possible 32 points. Only three teams collected fewer points than the Wild during March — two of those being the New Jersey Devils and Colorado Avalanche, each of whom owns the worst record in its respective conference. Although the Wild partially righted the ship with four straight victories to close the regular season, Minnesotans still have to be wondering what the heck went wrong for the team down the stretch — and whether it means the Wild are headed for a second-consecutive first-round playoff exit.One of the biggest factors behind the Wild’s March struggles was that they stopped scoring. Before their horrid stretch of play, the Wild were averaging 3.3 goals per game, second only to the Penguins (who on Feb. 28 were scoring 3.5 goals per game for the season). By contrast, the Wild scored just 2.5 goals per game during March.Scoring downturns like that don’t happen without a good reason, and for the Wild that reason involves shooting the puck. Through February, the Wild were scoring on 11 percent of the shots they took. During March, they scored on just 7.7 percent of the shots they took. Shooting percentage tends to regress to the mean, and so fluctuations can be expected, but Minnesota’s shooting percentage tanked precipitously last month.The Wild also got poor production from their power play in March: In 48 opportunities, they scored just five goals (12.5 percent), tying them for the fifth-worst scoring rate in the league with the man advantage for the month. On Feb. 28, the Wild had the third-best power play in the NHL, scoring on 22.6 percent of their opportunities. By the end of March, they’d fallen all the way to 10th.Minnesota’s suddenly anemic attack wouldn’t be as big a deal if they were still getting dominant play between the pipes, but like the skaters in front of him, Dubnyk’s numbers also regressed badly last month. In 14 appearances during March, he gave up 36 goals on 325 shots, good for a save percentage of .889 and a goals against average of 2.94. That’s pretty awful: If a qualified goalie had produced those numbers for the entire 2016-17 season, he’d rank 60th in save percentage and 51st in goals against average out of 62 netminders. (For reference’s sake, Dubnyk had a save percentage of .931 and a goals against average of 2.05 entering March, numbers that ranked first and second in the league, respectively, among goalies who’d played in 20 or more games.)Not all of Minnesota’s goaltending woes can be blamed on Dubnyk; he hasn’t gotten much help from backup Darcy Kuemper. Among goalies with at least 10 games played, Kuemper’s .902 save percentage and 3.13 goals against average rank 55th and 58th in the league. In his three appearances this March, Kuemper has a .870 save percentage and a 3.50 goals against average. Even for a No. 2 goalie, these are not numbers that inspire confidence, and Dubnyk has been forced to play more games than he might have if the Wild had a decent backup.Before last season, Dubnyk had never started more than 42 games. This season will mark the second-consecutive season he’s played in more than 60 games. Goaltender fatigue is hard to prove or disprove, but anecdotally speaking, it seems it may have hit Dubnyk hard this March — and a tired goalie is the last thing any team wants heading into the postseason. Last year, the Wild were bounced by the Dallas Stars in the first round in six games, giving up 3.5 goals a game over the course of the series. If Dubnyk is unable to recover from his current streak of poor play, it could mean more of the same for Minnesota come playoff time.In truth, Minnesota’s hot early-season play was also probably a mirage, to some degree or another. The Wild’s stellar shooting (11.1) and save (.925) percentages through the end of February added up to a ludicrous PDO of 103.6, which was tracking to be the second-highest single-season mark since PDO was first recorded in 2008 (trailing only this year’s Washington Capitals). That wasn’t sustainable, and their March skid just reinforces the maxim that PDO is unstable. Last month, the Wild posted a 7.7 shooting percentage and an .882 save percentage, good for a PDO of 95.9. (This is a very, very bad PDO; for reference, the worst PDO in the NHL this year belongs to Colorado, at 96.6.) Minnesota’s puck luck has morphed into some serious puck misfortune.Despite their very bad stretch run, the Wild still managed to finish second overall in the West. But in the post-lockout NHL, no Stanley Cup-winning team has collected less than 53 percent of available points over their final 20 regular-season games. By contrast, the Wild went just 8-10-2 in their final 20 games, collecting just 45 percent of the possible points on the table.A couple good analogues for this year’s Wild team are the 2013-14 St. Louis Blues and the 2014-15 Nashville Predators, both of whom finished third in the Western Conference, but also suffered disastrous stretch runs much like the Wild had this season. In the playoffs, each was bounced in the first round by the Chicago Blackhawks in six games.Unlike those teams, the Wild won’t have to face Chicago in the first round. (They play St. Louis starting on Wednesday.) But if the fates of those Blues and Predators teams tell us anything, it’s that the Wild might not be able to escape the first round. To avoid that fate, they’re going to need Dubnyk to return to his spectacular midseason form. But he will also need some help: The other players most responsible for Minnesota’s March slump (Mikko Koivu, Jason Pominville, Nino Niederreiter and Chris Stewart) must take some of the scoring burden from the few who didn’t decline (Eric Staal, Zach Parise and Mikael Granlund). Otherwise, the Wild’s great early-season play will have all been for naught. read more

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Seth Bearjar aims for a collegiate championship sweep with Ohio State pistol

OSU junior Seth Bearjar lines up a shot at the team’s shooting range in Converse Hall. Credit: Courtesy of OSUSeth Bearjar was 10 years old when he fired a BB gun that his father had given him for the first time. At that moment, he had no idea that it would spark what would one day become his passion. Jump ahead a decade, and Bearjar has now won multiple national titles with the Ohio State pistol team. The Buckeyes have been crowned champions at the Pistol Intercollegiate National Championships for the third straight year, giving them eight titles in program history. Bearjar, a junior, has been a member of the team throughout the current streak.  “I’m sure it is the same with all teams that have won more than one (championship). At a certain point it becomes expected to win,” Bearjar said. “However, it is still one of the most exciting feelings you will get.”Bearjar began shooting competitively with the pistol and rifle team at Patuxent High School in Lusby, Maryland, about an hour south of the United States Naval Academy. It was here that he picked up rifle, following in the footsteps of his older brother who also shot rifle for the team. He picked up pistol shooting his freshman year, as well, which he discovered he was much better at. Navy’s coach had wanted Bearjar to come shoot for them, but in his junior season, he decided that a military academy was not for him. Bearjar then began pursuing other options, and amid that search, he found OSU.“When I came and visited, I liked Ohio State,” Bearjar said. “I knew that the only way for me to continue shooting every day would be to be on a team, and Ohio State was the most supportive of having a team.” When he joined the team after arriving in Columbus, Bearjar said he experienced a bit of a transitional period moving from high school to college. “Coming here, there are some of the best shooters in the country,” Bearjar said. “I didn’t quite know how to respond. It was pretty intimidating at first.” Despite any expectations of first-year turbulence, Bearjar excelled during competition. The team won the national championship, and he earned second-team All-American honors in both free and air pistol.It was an important season for the team, as the seniors in their previous season were expected to win but fell short. In their final chance at a title, they did not disappoint. “When we won, it was crazy,” Bearjar said. “It was really exciting. It felt really good to know that I was part of the team that helped the seniors recover after their previous year.”Bearjar has now been on the team for three years, amassing a new championship at the end of each year. In that time, he has improved both as a shooter and a competitor. In his sophomore season, Bearjar earned first-team All-American honors in free pistol and was a second-team All-American in air pistol. This past season, he achieved honor roll mentions for air and free pistol. “He has become stronger physically,” said OSU coach Donna Knisley. “He has become very strong mentally, as well. He is probably one of my top mental shooters.”Looking forward to the coming season, Bearjar and his team have their sights aimed at another national title.“We really want to make it a fourth,” Bearjar said. “I think next year, as long as we win, and I think we have a really good chance, it will be one of the biggest celebrations. It will really be an achievement to win four years in a row.”Even after shooting competitively for over eight years now, Bearjar said there is definitely still room for improvement.“My personal goal is to make finals for all the events I shoot, but hopefully top three for air pistol,” he said. “It would be a nice way to end my shooting career.” read more

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Jackets remain confident despite fivegame skid

December has not been kind to the Columbus Blue Jackets. “December is the big month in the NHL schedule for everybody,” Jackets coach Scott Arniel said. “This is an important month. Not off to a very good start.” The Blue Jackets have lost five consecutive games, including all three games in December. Last December, the Blue Jackets went 2-9-5. “I don’t care what happened last season,” Blue Jackets defenseman Mike Commodore said. “Honestly, I don’t give a s—. It’s a new season, we’ve lost a couple games in a row — big deal.” Forward R.J. Umberger said he thinks the team is frustrated but not dead. “I think any team would be a little frustrated when you lose five in a row, when you lose a couple big games,” Umberger said. “How do you respond to it? We still control our own destiny — it’s December.” Commodore and Umberger’s frustrations came after Saturday’s 7-2 home loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins, which was preceded by a 5-0 loss against the Buffalo Sabres on Friday in Buffalo. Arniel managed to find some positives in the game against the Penguins. The team has allowed six goals while on the penalty kill in the last two games. Commodore could not explain the weekend’s penalty-killing woes. “Every once in a while, the pucks are going to go in,” Commodore said. “That’s just how it is, and they’ve gone in the last two nights.” Commodore said he thinks the team might be mentally fragile amid the string of losses, but it is not an excuse to keep losing. “There’s no point in sitting around and sulking about it,” he said. “We have to keep working, and I think we’ll come together.” Arniel said he and the staff need to work with the players to get their minds set on winning. “It’s part of what coaching is,” Arniel said. “I have to try to change the psyche of players and (not) think that just because they gave up a goal the game’s over, or if you lose a game, it’s the end of the year.” Arniel said the losing streak stems from poor play in many facets of the game. “The power play obviously at home (has) been a big one,” Arniel said. “We were one of the best goals-against teams in the league. When you’re losing, you can nitpick like crazy.” But Arniel said he wants to put the poor play behind him and focus on the Dallas Stars, who play in Columbus tonight. “I just want to win Monday night. That’s all I care about,” Arniel said. “I don’t care what’s already happened. I care about Monday night.” read more

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Womens Big Ten Tournament title up for grabs

The Ohio State women’s basketball team, the two-time defending Big Ten Tournament champion, is the No. 5 seed in this year’s conference tournament. No. 1-seed Michigan State, which earned the top spot for the first time in program history, has three losses in conference play.Two of those losses came against the Buckeyes.In other words, the 2011 Big Ten Tournament is up for grabs.First-round games are set to begin on Thursday at Conseco Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. When the tournament kicks off, the field will feature six Big Ten programs that had schedules among the top-50 strongest in the country, according to NCAA.org.After Purdue’s 90-67 loss to OSU on Feb. 10 at Nationwide Arena, Boilermaker coach Sharon Versyp said even more teams could be selected for the NCAA Tournament.“I think there’s at least seven teams that should go to the NCAA,” Versyp said. “It’s a very tough conference. Any given day, anything can happen.”With its 80-47 win against Wisconsin on Sunday, OSU (19-9, 10-6 Big Ten) earned a first-round bye and a date with No. 4-seed Iowa (22-7, 10-6 Big Ten).After the game, OSU coach Jim Foster said that despite OSU’s occasional struggles during the regular season, including two three-game losing streaks, it was always capable of finishing the season strongly.“When everybody was in a panic, I thought we were still redeemable,” Foster said. “I’ve seen teams figure it out at different stages of the season.”Should Foster’s Buckeyes beat Iowa to advance to the semifinals, they could face Michigan State (25-4, 13-3 Big Ten). OSU managed to sweep the season series against the Spartans with a 67-53 victory on Jan. 16 at home and a 54-53 win Thursday in East Lansing, Mich.After Sunday’s win, senior center Jantel Lavender said it does not matter whom the Buckeyes play.“We’re starting to show who we are,” she said. “We have a really strong team. We don’t want (the season) to be over.”Besides strong performances against the Spartans, the Buckeyes beat three of four squads seeded above them in the conference tournament. Foster said he is comfortable with his team ahead of what he hopes will be a “months”-long postseason.“I think we’re in a very good place and we understand how we got here, which is more important,” Foster said. “We had to earn it.”The subject of parity in this year’s Big Ten Tournament was discussed during the postgame press conference on Sunday.Foster smiled and said, “It’s certainly going to be more interesting than it looked a few weeks ago.” read more

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Ohio State mens soccer preparing for first ever matchup with Rutgers

OSU senior midfielder Max Moller (11) attempts to dribble past Bowling Green junior defender Jake Genrich during an Oct. 22 game at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won, 3-0.Credit: Patrick Kalista / Lantern photographerIn the final stretch of the season, the Ohio State men’s soccer team seems to be getting hot at the right time — or at least taking advantage of a more manageable schedule.After 11 of the Buckeyes’ (6-5-3, 3-2-0) first 12 opponents ranked in the top 60 of the RPI, OSU took care of business against No. 138 Wisconsin and No. 99 Bowling Green in its last two.“This could be one of the most important parts of the season,” senior midfielder Max Moller said. “We want to show for this university and really represent this university really well. This could be the difference for the NCAA Tournament and for the Big Ten. We need to take advantage of these weaker teams.”That trend could continue on Saturday, when OSU is scheduled to take on Rutgers (5-8-1, 1-4-1) — which is ranked No. 80 in the RPI.OSU coach John Bluem said he doesn’t know much about Rutgers, as the schools have never met because Rutgers is a first-year addition to the Big Ten. Bluem said he had a chance to scout the Scarlet Knights earlier in the week, however, and was impressed with what he saw.“From what I’ve seen on the videotape, they have some really talented attacking players,” Bluem said. “So defensively, we’re going to have to be spot on.”The game is the second of a three-game homestand that will represent the final home games of the regular season for the Buckeyes. However, players — such as freshman forward Marcus McCrary — plan to make at least one more appearance in Columbus this season to host a quarterfinal matchup in the Big Ten Tournament, McCrary said.“We need to win out to play at home again and hopefully go to the NCAA Tournament,” he said.Bluem explained that the goal for the Buckeyes is to finish in the top four of the Big Ten in order to host a quarterfinal game. Currently, the Buckeyes sit fourth in the conference with nine points, three points behind leader Penn State and a point behind Michigan State and Maryland, who are tied for second.“The key is to finish the regular season somewhere in the top four,” Bluem said. “Everyone is so tightly packed together, and I think it’s going to stay that way, so it’s all going to come down to taking care of business here at home.”The Buckeyes are set to have an opportunity to control their own destiny in their final two games, when they take on one of the two teams currently a point ahead of them on the road. For now, however, the focus is on beating one of the weaker teams in the conference, Bluem said. The Scarlet Knights are currently second to last in the Big Ten.“Rutgers at home, that’s an important one to win that one,” Bluem said. “That’s what I think it’s going to come down to. I think 13 points will probably keep you in the top four.”In addition to the two full days of rest leading up to the game against Rutgers, Bluem also gave his team an additional breather in the second half against Bowling Green. Only redshirt-senior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov and sophomore defender Tyler Kidwell were not pulled out of the game by the end on Wednesday.“Obviously we got to rest some people tonight, we came out of the game without injuries, so that was an important thing,” Bluem said after the game. “To get some of the guys, the substitute players, a chance to get out on the field a little bit and run around, that was great, good for them, and they did a very, very good job.”Bluem said while the team has been fortunate to stay healthy this late in the season, he was still glad to have the opportunity to manage his players’ workloads.“I think we’re pretty lucky right now,” Bluem said. “Knock on wood that we don’t suffer any injuries, hopefully that will be the case and we can make it through the rest of our games without any serious problems.”Ivanov, who has not allowed a goal in his past two starts, might have a chance to see that streak continue against a Scarlet Knights team that has been shut out in five of its past nine games. Ivanov’s longest career shutout streak was four, set late last season.OSU’s matchup against Rutgers is scheduled for a 7 p.m. kickoff Saturday at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

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Football LChristian Blue Smith commits to Ohio State

Ohio State’s top-ranked recruiting class of 2018 received a boost as four-star wide receiver recruit L’Christian “Blue” Smith committed to the Buckeyes Sunday. The 6-foot-5, 205-pound receiver is regarded as the 119th-best prospect in the nation by 247Sports Composite and is considered the fourth-best in both the state and at his listed position of athlete.Smith chose the Buckeyes’ offer over other scholarship offers from Michigan, Penn State, Alabama and more. The Wayne High School product from Dayton was first offered a scholarship from the Buckeyes on March 21, 2016 and unofficially visited the school five times, while attending three camps.The commitment of Smith adds to what is already regarded by 247Sports as the best 2018 recruiting class in the nation. Smith becomes the 11th four-star recruit to join the class and the 17th overall prospect to commit to the Buckeyes. The rest of the class is comprised of four five-star recruits and two three-star recruits. read more

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Girl two dies in hospital after father killed in Newquay sea tragedy

first_imgThe family, who are from Croydon in south London, were holidaying in the Newquay area when the incident happened.Detective Constable Jarrod Yewen, who is investigating the incident, said: “This is a tragic case for all those involved and our thoughts remain with the family at what is a deeply traumatic time for them.”The deaths are not being investigated as suspicious, therefore the police will now prepare a file for HM Coroner and an inquest will be held in due course.”A fundraising page, set up to support the family, has seen more than £30,000 donated. A two-year-old girl who was swept into the sea during an incident in which her father was killed has died in hospital, police said.Mckayla Bruynius died at Bristol Children’s Hospital on Tuesday night, having been caught by a large wave at Fistral beach in Newquay, Cornwall, last Friday.Her father, Rudy Bruynius, also died in the incident, during a weekend in which a total of six people were killed in tragedies around the coast.The little girl’s mother, Lisinda, paid tribute to her daughter and husband in a statement released by Devon and Cornwall Police. “Rudy was a loving, caring and supportive husband, father and friend,” she said.”He had a great sense of humour and was an active person. He always put other people first. Mckayla was a busy bee and always happy.”I am in disbelief at what has happened. I am so shocked at how quickly the sea condition changed on that day whilst we were enjoying a family time together in Cornwall.”I pray that others can learn from our tragedy as I do not wish for anybody to go through our grief.”I would like to thank the RNLI, the staff at Royal Cornwall Hospital, the staff from Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, the emergency services and all the members of public for their generous support and prayers they have given towards my family.”I would especially like to thank the people of Cornwall for their messages of love and offers of help.”I will never forget the close community spirit displayed towards us. Please respect our privacy at this really difficult time and allow my sons and I to try to come to terms with what has happened.” I pray that others can learn from our tragedy as I do not wish for anybody to go through our griefLisinda Bruynius Rudy and Bruynius Bruynius with their childrenCredit:Apexcenter_img Rudy and Bruynius Bruynius with their children The family of five were on rocks at Fistral beach at around 5.20pm last Friday when Mr and Mrs Bruynius and Mckayla were washed into the sea by a large wave.The RNLI lifeboat, Coastguard helicopter, beach lifeguards, police, air ambulance and ambulance crews attended the scene.Mr and Mrs Bruynius were rescued from the water by RNLI lifeguards.They carried out CPR on Mr Bruynius before he was taken by air ambulance to the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro. The gardener, who was originally from South Africa, died later that evening.Mckayla was recovered from the sea by an RNLI lifeboat before being flown to Derriford Hospital in Plymouth and later transferred to Bristol Children’s Hospital.Mr and Mrs Bruynius’s two sons managed to stay on the rocks and were located by the Coastguard. They suffered minor injuries before being taken by ambulance to hospital. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Questions over Parliament security as motorcyclist rides through gate shortly after terrorist

first_imgMembers of public and police officers pay their respects to the victims of Westminster terror attack in Parliament Square, London Credit: Tolga Akmen/LNP Members of public and police officers pay their respects to the victims of Westminster terror attack in Parliament Square, London  The gates to Westminster were left open minutes after Pc Palmer was stabbed, it has emerged.Security footage shows a motorcyclist driving through the open gates.The footage, which was filmed by a Times journalist, shows the unidentified man riding through the Carriage Gates where attacker Khalid Masood had struck minutes earlier.In the film, the heroic policeman Pc Palmer can be seen lying on the ground, wounded, as the motorcyclist makes his way into Westminster.Carriage Gates have been repeatedly identified as a weak spot in Parliamentary security, as the gates are often open for ministerial cars and parliamentary staff to pass through.Armed police reportedly stood at the gates until two years ago when a decision was taken to replace them with a mobile patrol. One source was quoted by the Times as saying: “This was a fixed point but that changed following political pressure.”They wanted a traditional British bobby on the gate; they wanted that image – but this is a sensitive security area. If there had been two armed officers on the gates then they would have taken the shot. Thank God there was only one nutter in that car.”Nigel Evans MP, the former deputy Speaker of the Commons, told Sky News: “I was horrified to see the footage, the bodies on the floor. And the vehicle is the weapon of choice now, which means we need to look again at basic security.”I think there’s about eight or nine points of entry for members of Parliament and they all need to be looked at afresh.center_img “We have unarmed officers at the front, they are the first point of contact with the public and people like to take selfies with them and it’s almost a tradition.”But there have to be armed guards where there are areas of weakness. A terrorist isn’t going to use the public entrance with security scanners”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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