Tamil to be deported from Canada in 2 weeks

John arrived in Vancouver aboard the MV Sun Sea in 2010. He spent three months aboard the ship crowded with nearly 500 migrants.After spending six months in detention, he moved to Toronto, where he found steady contracting work and won the respect of his employer. “The thought about what is going to happen to me is what is killing me inside. I hope the Canadian authorities take a second look at what I’m going to be facing through means of this deportation order.”Under Canada’s new refugee law, John now has to wait a full year before he can appeal to the Canada Border Services Agency for a pre-removal risk assessment, or to the immigration department on humanitarian and compassionate grounds. One year is enough time for the government to deport him.“All of this is the result of the new law,” says John’s lawyer, Hadayt Nazami. “I haven’t been able to sleep well ever since I heard about this deportation business,” he says. At the Toronto construction site where he worked until recently, the migrant (who we’ll call John), described how he’s been affected by Canada’s plan to deport him. John doesn’t blame Canada for the decision, but he thinks the refugee board was ill-informed about the reality in Sri Lanka. “They don’t realize what I am going to be going through when I land in Sri Lanka,” he said through a translator. “If the new law hadn’t been implemented this would not have happened. And John’s case is only one of many that are in this particular situation. In countries like Sri Lanka, the political situation is volatile. Canada has recognized this, Canada has criticized Sri Lanka for its human rights record.”Nazami says that new evidence has come to light through human rights groups, the United Nations and even other countries like Britain and Australia, indicating that despite the Sri Lankan government’s claim the war is over, torture and extra-judicial killings continue.But those facts cannot be heard because John’s avenues for appeal are now blocked.Nazami had only one legal option left — to seek a stay of his deportation at the Federal Court, so he did that last fall. But just before the hearing, the government withdrew its deportation order.“We knew who the judge was, in this instance and she had previously stopped similar deportations. That’s when they cancelled the removal,” he says.The government then issued a second deportation order, and Nazami again went to court to seek a stay. The government again cancelled the deportation with no explanation.Nazami says he suspects the government is waiting for a judge who is likely to reject the stay of removal.“Whatever I say would be speculating, but the way it happens to be — cancelling after discovering the identity of the judge — appears to us to be judge-shopping.”The lawyer says the board granted refugee status to other Sun Sea passengers with cases nearly identical to John’s.The government has now issued a third deportation order for Feb. 13 and once again, John intends to appeal to the Federal Court.John’s employer, David Tinmouth, is upset by the way the case has been handled.“I’m not sure why such energy is being spent by us to send this man back to Sri Lanka,” Tinmouth says. “I have been working day in day out with him for a long time now and he just strikes me as somebody who wants to live an ordinary life, send his kids to school, have a peaceful life.”Still, Tinmouth says he’s hopeful that cooler heads will prevail either at the border services agency or at the Federal Court. But he thinks Canada is going to get a black eye internationally for its removal of some checks and balances from the system.“That is what human rights should be about, is the government going out of its way for ordinary people,” he says. (CBC) The case of a Tamil migrant whose refugee claim was denied reveals a key problem with Canada’s new refugee law, his lawyer says.The migrant, who can’t be named for fear of reprisals against his young family in Sri Lanka, is now blocked from two key avenues of appeal. But last year, the Immigration and Refugee Board denied his claim.The judge who heard his case agreed with the facts John presented: that he was tortured repeatedly by the Sri Lankan military before he escaped to Thailand, and that he was never a member of or associated with the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, which Canada views as a terrorist group.But the judge disagreed with John’s belief that if he goes home, he will be tortured once again, and his family could be the target of abuse or kidnapping. read more

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2500 cancer diagnosis could be avoided each week if Britons made lifestyle

first_imgDr Katrina Brown, Cancer Research UK’s statistical information and risk manager, and the study’s lead author, said the public did not understand the risks of smoking until relatively recently, and it is hoped that increased information and awareness will mean the same will eventually become of obesity.Asked about accusations of fat shaming following a recent obesity-related campaign by the charity, she said: “We definitely need to change attitudes towards obesity.”As a charity we have a responsibility to communicate evidence about risk.”Highlighting studies that show public perceptions of what is a normal weight have gone up,Professor Linda Bauld, Cancer Research UK’s prevention expert, said: “Obesity is a huge health threat right now, and it will only get worse if nothing is done.”People regard being large as increasingly normal – that is a shift in cultural norms and acceptability.”So we need to not only convey the message about the health risks, but also that our population is getting larger.”Sir Harpal added: “Leading a healthy life doesn’t guarantee that a person won’t get cancer, but it can stack the odds in your favour. These figures show that we each can take positive steps to help reduce our individual risk of the disease.”This research clearly demonstrates the impact of smoking and obesity on cancer risk.Prevention is the most cost-effective way of beating cancer and the UK Government could do much more to help people by making a healthy choice the easy choice.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He said the landmark study demonstrates that prevention is the best way of beating the killer disease, adding that the Government could be doing “much more” to help people make healthier choices.The latest figures, calculated from 2015 cancer data, show more than 135,500 cases of cancer a year could be prevented – equating to 37.7 per cent of all cancers diagnosed in the UK every year and rising to 41.5 per cent in Scotland.Smoking remains the biggest preventable cause of cancer – responsible for around 32,200 cases of cancer in men and around 22,000 in women.Excess weight is the second biggest preventable cause of cancer, with around 22,800 (6.3%) cases down to being overweight or obese.The research published in the British Journal of Cancer shows that obesity causes 13 different types of cancer, including bowel, breast, womb and kidney, and more than one in 20 cases could be prevented by maintaining a healthy weight. Smoking rates are falling, and obesity will soon take over as the leading modifiable risk factor for cancer center_img More than 2,500 people a week would avoid being diagnosed with cancer if they made lifestyle changes, such as exercising and lowering their weight,  research suggests.Nearly 40 per cent of all cancers diagnosed in the UK every year could be avoided, a new report by Cancer Research UK has found.Smoking is the biggest avoidable cause of cancer, followed by excess weight, overexposure to UV radiation from the sun and sunbeds, drinking alcohol, eating too little fibre, and outdoor air pollution.Experts presenting the data warned that with smoking rates continuing to go down and rates of obesity on the increase, obesity could overtake smoking as the biggest killer.Cancer Research UK chief executive Sir Harpal Kumar said: “Obesity is potentially the new smoking, if we’re not careful.”My sense would be it’ll be some time in next couple of decades that we’ll see those two switch around.” Smoking rates are falling, and obesity will soon take over as the leading modifiable risk factor for cancer Credit:Jonathan Brady PAlast_img read more

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