Investment Makes Job Skills Programs More Accessible in Valley

first_imgThe province announced a $550,000 investment today, May 21, for a new centre in Kentville that will grow the economy by helping people find work. The funding for the PeopleWorx Society, a non-profit organization helping people develop essential skills for today’s job market, will go towards construction of the Kings Opportunity Service Centre. Offering a complete range of professional services, the society helps people reach their personal, educational and employment potential. “We are committed to getting the province back to balance and one way we are doing that is by making strategic investments that will improve our workforce,” said Community Services Minister Denise Peterson-Rafuse. “PeopleWorx has a proven track record of helping Nova Scotians enter the workforce or improve their job status. This investment will make life better for families.” The new building will bring together the PeopleWorx Annapolis Valley Work Center, Kings Employment Counselling, Community Service’s Job Finder’s Club and Career Resource Center and the Continuing Care Assistant program under one roof. PeopleWorx first opened its doors in 1986 and offers programs and services in employment counselling, enhanced reading levels, and job search skills. But its real impact is found in the renewed sense of confidence its students leave with. “Coming to the work center really helped me be me,” said Debbie MacInnes a recent graduate and May 2010 valedictorian of the program. “I now have a strong foundation and a new direction, only this time I am more confident, more educated and much prouder.” Construction of the $2.4 million, 18,000 square foot facility, will begin this spring and is expected to open in the fall. “The Kings Opportunity Service Centre is a much anticipated addition to our community,” said Bill Travis executive director, PeopleWorx Society. “The centre will improve the quality of employment services and help residents become more successful in the job market.”last_img read more

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Applications for US unemployment benefits increase to 302k still at prerecession levels

WASHINGTON – More people sought U.S. unemployment benefits last week, but jobless claims remain at pre-recession levels.Weekly applications for unemployment aid rose 23,000 to a seasonally adjusted 302,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. The prior week’s claims were revised down to 279,000, the lowest since May 2000.The four-week average, a less volatile measure, fell 3,500 to 297,250. That’s the lowest average since April 2006, more than a year before the Great Recession began at the end of 2007.Applications are a proxy for layoffs. When employers keep their workers, it suggests potential income gains, active hiring and confidence that the economy is growing.“The claims data continue to signal an improving labour market,” said Jim O’Sullivan, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics, in a client note.Employers added 288,000 jobs in June, the fifth straight month of job gains above 200,000. That’s the first such stretch since 1999, during the height of the dot-com boom. The unemployment rate fell to 6.1 per cent, the lowest since September 2008.Economists forecast that the July employment report being released Friday will show that 225,000 jobs were added, according to a survey by the data firm FactSet. They forecast that the unemployment rate held at 6.1 per cent in July.Payroll provider ADP said Wednesday that private employers added 218,000 jobs in July, down from 281,000 in June.Steady hiring gains have yet to lift wages by much. Wage growth has slightly outpaced inflation since the recession ended more than five years ago.But more people with jobs increases the total number of paychecks, which could boost consumer spending and growth. by Josh Boak, The Associated Press Posted Jul 31, 2014 6:37 am MDT Applications for US unemployment benefits increase to 302k; still at pre-recession levels AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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