Students learn about international programs at Study Abroad Fair

first_imgTags: NDI, study abroad Students interested in studying abroad gathered in the galleria of the Jordan Hall of Science on Monday night for the University’s 2015 Study Abroad Fair, during which they could meet with international program representatives and learn more about the wide variety of programs that Notre Dame offers.Notre Dame believes studying abroad is a vital element to academic formation, according to the Notre Dame International (NDI) 2015-2016 study abroad brochure, and as such provides eligible students with an array of opportunities to take classes abroad.Sophomore Rebecca Wiley said the variety of classes and experiences outside of the classroom are what draw her to the idea of studying abroad.“The ability to discover a new culture different from what we get here on campus is what draws me to the opportunity to study abroad,” Wiley said.Wiley said after visiting the Ireland booth at the Study Abroad Fair that the unique class offerings in Dublin appealed to her.“Studying abroad gives you a chance to take new classes — for example, in Dublin you have to take an Irish culture class,” Wiley said. “It gives you a chance to meet new people that you never knew here on campus and collaborate on projects and subjects that you’re interested in.”This year’s Study Abroad Fair also provided pizza and door prizes for students that came to learn more about the international programs. Door prizes included two round-trip plane tickets to NDI study abroad locations and three $200 gift cards to Hammes Bookstore.“I was especially excited for the two free round-trip tickets knowing that next year would be the first year that airfare would be considered a personal expense,” Wiley said.Sophomore Erin Callaghan said the fair helped her narrow down her choices for program locations based on her language of study. Callaghan, a German major, said that she hopes to be fluent in German and believes studying abroad will further contribute to sharpening her language acquisition skills.“Learning a new language makes me more appreciative of other people’s cultures because we are often usually only focused on our own,” Callaghan said. “It gives you a broad perspective of other parts of the world that we may not be exposed to.”Sophomore Rosie LoVoi said she was surprised by the large interest in study abroad programs.“I recognized a lot of people in my grade who were preparing to apply, but I also saw more freshmen than I expected,” Lovoi said. “I think it goes to show that the Notre Dame community is really interested in furthering their academic experience outside of what’s familiar.”After attending the fair, LoVoi, a Program of Liberal Studies major, said she was most interested in participating in the Dublin program.“Dublin is a really interesting city that has a lot of literary history and resources to offer,” she said.LoVoi said she thought the fair was a success and gave students and representatives a chance to share their personal opinions on their experiences studying abroad.“It was really awesome to see how many different options there were that can appeal to different kinds of interest and can get people out of their comfort zones,” she said.last_img read more

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Student groups prepare to host Notre Dame Night Market

first_imgStudents looking for a study break Thursday night can visit the Dahnke Family Ballroom in the Duncan Student Center from 7-9 p.m. for the Notre Dame Night Market. Hosted by the Notre Dame Taiwanese Student Association and cosponsored by the Multicultural Student Programs and Services, the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies and the Nanovic Institute for European Studies, among others, the night market brings together multiple cultural clubs for a night of entertainment, food and games.As a change from past years, this year’s night market will feature booths from non-Asian American cultural clubs, such as the Caribbean Student Association of ND and Latino Student Alliance.“By collaborating with these different clubs and departments, I’m trying to make it more open to the campus, more open to the Notre Dame community and more inclusive in general,” junior Isabel Chan, co-president of the Taiwanese Student Association, said.Senior and Taiwanese Student Association co-president Kathrine Fetizanan said night markets are one of Taiwan’s “most inviting tourist attractions” and the club’s goal is to bring that to campus.“We’re just basically trying to let people have a glimpse into what a night market could be,” she said. “ … The purpose is to have everyone included, make it all inclusive and have people not only see Taiwanese culture but also … try to look at different cultures and immerse themselves a little. It’s a cultural immersion experience.”Students who attend the event will receive two tickets to use at the booths with the option to purchase additional tickets. Chan said five tickets will be $5 and 10 tickets will be $8. With these tickets, students can get food or play games at the booths.The Japan Club will be making mochi and rice balls this year, senior and Japan Club vice president Billy Adler said.Students can also play games at the booths to earn raffle tickets. The raffle prizes include snack baskets, an Echo Dot, headphones and gift cards.Adler said the planning for the event includes logistical preparation as well as making the food.“My favorite part is actually on the day of,” he said. “It’s always crazy two hours before the event’s starting. Everyone’s running around trying to get things set up. I actually really enjoy that.”Fetizanan said she enjoys the event because it highlights a part of Taiwanese culture while allowing people to have fun.“Night markets for me hold a really sentimental value because part of my family is Taiwanese,” she said. “It was a place not only for fun and social gathering; it was a place where our family could just be family. I really like that this night market gives people the opportunity to not only culturally immerse themselves, but also spend time with friends and just take a little break from life.”Last year, about 150 students attended the night market, Chan said. This year, the planning committee is expecting about 300 people, which Fetizanan said is due to the new location.“It’s in the Danhke ballroom, so we have a lot more space,” she said. “ … Because it’s bigger and there’s more clubs participating and there’s a lot more to do this year, we’re expecting a larger turnout.”Tags: culture, Multicultural Student Programs and Services, Notre Dame Night Market, Notre Dame Taiwanese Student Associationlast_img read more

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Marselis Parsons retiring from WCAX, Anson Tebbetts to take over

first_imgWCAX-TV,Long-time WCAX-TV news director and anchor Marselis Div Parson is retiring, it was announced today, and former WCAX reporter Anson Tebbetts will rejoin the South Burlington television station and take over Parsons off-air duties. Tebbetts currently is deputy secretary of the Vermont Agency of Agriculture. Tebbetts will take over as news director, but will not be the regular news anchor.Parsons, meanwhile, will remain as the 6 pm anchor through the summer. He has been with WCAX for 42 years. Parsons was named news director in 1984. Since 1967, he has been a reporter, anchor, program producer and now news director. Over my years in public service, I ve known Marselis to be a fair and dedicated journalist of the first order, said Governor Douglas. As a reporter, then anchor and news director, he has shaped Vermont history with intelligent coverage and piercing insight. His love of Vermont and passion for telling a good story shines through in each evening’s broadcast. Div will be truly missed.Tebbetts will become news director at the end of May. Darren Perron will succeed Parsons as anchor of the 6 pm news.Tebbetts, a native Vermonter, will be stepping down as Vermont s Deputy Secretary of Agriculture immediately, a position he has served in since January 2007. He joined WCAX News as the Rutland Correspondent 1994, moving to Montpelier in 1995 to cover state government and the Legislature.Peter Martin, president of WCAX, said, We are delighted to welcome Anson back to WCAX as leader of the News Department. He is a gifted reporter and storyteller with a deep love for and extraordinary knowledge of Vermont. He was a farmer before he was a reporter, and even while he was a reporter. As our Montpelier Correspondent he demonstrated an extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge about Vermont government and politics, even while producing delightful features about aspects of Vermont life off the beaten path. He is uniquely qualified to carry on the tradition of news which has made WCAX Channel 3 Vermont s Own .In assuming his new position, Tebbetts said, “I look forward to building on the strong tradition of story telling and fairness that’s been part of the Channel 3 newsroom for decades.”Raised in Cabot, Tebbetts was also news director of WDEV Radio in Waterbury from 1987 to 1989. He graduated from Emerson College in 1987. He lives on the family farm in Cabot with his wife Vicki and their two young children.Tebbetts has won numerous awards from the Associated Press in both TV and radio, including his coverage of the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, Norway. In 2001, the Vermont Farm Bureau honored him with the Friend of the Farmer Award. He continues to host the popular For the Birds program.Perron began his broadcast career in 1994 as an intern at WCAX News.  He joined the News Department full time in July 1995. He was promoted to Senior Reporter in 2004. Perron has anchored WCAX s weekend broadcasts. He has both produced series reports on a wide range of topics and has also covered of breaking news.In announcing Perron s appointment, Martin said, Darren is one of the most gifted Vermont broadcast journalists of his generation. He will bring to the broadcast the perspective of a young Vermonter with a deep knowledge of his state and an ability to connect with people of all ages. He will ably carry on the tradition established by Marselis over the two decades he anchored the news.Also a native Vermonter from Barton, Perron attended schools in Barton, and graduated from Lake Union High School in Orleans and Castleton State College. He lives in Burlington.Parsons said of the transition announced today: It has been a privilege to be the News Director of this station for almost 25 five years, and an honor to be invited into the homes of Vermonters, as well as viewers in New Hampshire, New York and even Quebec. I am confident Anson will continue the traditions of WCAX established by those who hired me, and I look forward to watching Channel 3 broadcasts with Darren and Kristin Kelly. They are two excellent journalists. I am proud to say I hired all three and I have watched Anson, Kristin and Darren develop into award winning broadcasters, Parsons said. It s not yet time too say goodbye, but it is certainly time to wish all three of them and all my colleagues at WCAX the best in the future.Kelly, once she returns from maternity leave later in the summer, and Perron will be the principal anchors on the evening broadcast.As part of the budget cutting maneuvering between the Douglas Administration and the Legislature, one of the two deputy agriculture secretary positions had been earmarked for elimination, though no action had yet been taken. The administration, Legislature and state union have been wrangling for months over how state payroll could be reduced and/or positions cut.Tebbetts was approached by WCAX as early as last February. The details of his hiring, however were not finalized until today.Secretary of Agriculture Roger Allbee said, Anson has been an integral part of our team here at the Agency and I will miss him personally and professionally. Many times I have relied on his guidance to navigate difficult situations. Anson has a wonderful way of looking at things that helped us get through some tough experiences.During his tenure as deputy secretary, Tebbetts was instrumental in getting many programs off the ground to help farmers and the community alike. “Our farmers are the backbone of Vermont. Driving our agricultural economy with strength, resilience, and creativity in changing times, Vermont’s farmers keep our land open, keep our people employed, and supply us with world-class, fresh products. They are leaders in reinforcing what makes Vermont special for all of us. I am honored to have worked with Vermont’s agricultural community, said Tebbetts. I have appreciated Anson s dedication to the state and to the agricultural community in Vermont, commented Governor Douglas. We will miss his enthusiasm and thoughtfulness, but I wish him the best in his exciting new endeavor. I have really appreciated this experience and have enjoyed working for agriculture and the state. The people at the Agency are some of the most dedicated and passionate people I ve had the opportunity to work with, said Tebbetts.last_img read more

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Yarn-spinning judge keeps history alive

first_imgJan Pudlow Senior Editor Bucked off his horse, Nelson Bailey was peeled off the ground and rushed to the hospital, where both broken arms ended up in casts.His wife had to do just about everything for him, and that’s when he started growing his long gray beard in 1988.“He claims I was so mad at him for breaking both arms at once that he wasn’t about to let me get near him with a razor,” says Carol Bailey, his wife for 38 years. “I simply say, ‘But that was one less thing I had to do for you, honey.’”Now that beard is the unmistakable trademark of Palm Beach County Judge Bailey, the only judge presiding in the branch courthouse in rural Belle Glade serving the folks of the vast agricultural area of sugar cane, vegetables, and rice. And 63-year-old Bailey is the only judge listed in the National Directory of American Storytellers as an authentic “Florida Cracker Storyteller.”Poking out of his judge’s black robe are Western cowboy boots, well-worn from living on a small ranch in Loxahatchee Groves, where he actually knows how to herd cattle.When he’s not behind the bench, Judge Bailey is likely atop a gentler horse, Domino, with cow whip in hand, cur dog Cooter at his side, channeling Florida’s cow hunters from the 1800s and telling tales of the way things were in the Sunshine State long before turnpikes zipped tourists to Disney World.Even his horse is historical, an endangered species with Spanish bloodlines going back nearly 500 years, known as a true “Florida cracker horse.”The power of the spoken word has been around “since the time of the caveman sitting around the fire telling stories,” Judge Bailey says. “Human beings are the only animals who tell stories. We are the only ones who need to. It’s how we learn who we are.”In what he calls a “multi-colored quilt of Florida heritage and history,” he weaves stories of Native-American mound builders before the 1500s; Spanish explorers and settlers from the 1500s to the 1800s; Seminoles and Black Seminoles of the 1700s and 1800s; black history unique to Florida from the 1500s to the 1900s, and Florida’s cowboys or “cow hunters” of the 1800s to today.His audiences have included the Conference of County Court Judges, South Palm Beach County Bar Association, Florida Humanities Council board members, 100 horseback riders crossing the state in the Florida Cracker Trail Ride, and at a major Chautaugua event at DeFuniak Springs. His favorite audience, though, is school teachers, who can then go retell his stories to their students, in the hopes of fostering appreciation for the wild side of this diverse state.The judge’s storytelling sidekick all began in 1988, when he first learned of a coast-to-coast ride following an old cattle trail, and trotted next to a 72-year-old fourth-generation Florida rancher who mesmerized him with stories from the 1800s.“I just had a sensation of riding that horse back into history,” Judge Bailey said.So when he gave a horse demonstration at the South Florida Fair, Bailey was inspired to sit atop his horse and tell some stories, too. The rest is history. A second career was born.“Barely a week goes by that I’m not doing a presentation,” Judge Bailey says. “I absolutely love it. Basically, it’s a cultural diversity program with a heavy emphasis on Florida’s strong Spanish heritage and unique black history they don’t teach in schools, along with cracker history. You know the word ‘cracker’ comes from the crack of a cow whip. And old-timers take pride in their cracker heritage.”The main message interlaced in his storytelling is this: “We have a history and heritage that is unique to Florida. You need to pass that on to young people and give them a sense of place.”In a rapidly growing state where most residents are originally from someplace else, Judge Bailey wants people to think of “home” not as where they once came from, or their new home state’s glitz and sparkle of tourist attractions, but of that multi-colored quilt made of patches of Florida history that reach back more than five centuries.“The environmental movement today keeps the land in the forefront, but it fails to take the story of that land and give it equal emphasis,” he says.Love of Florida’s backwoods and his unconventional approach to life sprang from Bailey’s childhood helping his father, the late Raymond Bailey, as a beekeeper tending the bee yards in Tavares and around Central Florida.That independent streak followed Bailey into his legal career. After graduating from Florida State University College of Law’s charter class in 1969, he did stints as an attorney with the Florida Department of Agriculture and assistant attorney general. In 1973, Bailey and his friend Rendell Brown formed what he calls the first white-black 50-50 law partnership in the history of Florida, specializing in criminal defense work.After Gov. Lawton Chiles appointed him judge in 1995, Bailey started Palm Beach County’s Felony Drug Court and helped establish the Governor’s N.O.P.E. Task Force (Narcotics Overdose Prevention & Education) program that sends parents of young people who died of drug overdoses, along with a team of prosecutors, defense lawyers, law enforcement officers, criminal court judges, and recovering addicts into schools to give high-school students a wake-up call on the consequences of drug addiction.Bailey also initiated Palm Beach County’s “Morgue Tour” for convicted DUI offenders, until a change in Florida law ended the program.When defendants first appear in court on charges of driving under the influence, Alcoholic Anonymous speakers are there to share their real-life struggles with alcohol addiction.And anyone charged with soliciting prostitutes must listen to what Judge Bailey calls a “rather blunt program of health education about sexually transmitted diseases.”At the heart of all of those programs, Judge Bailey says, is the art of the storyteller.When he walks into his courtroom, Carol Bailey said she has been repeatedly told, defendants seeing him for the first time think, ‘Oh, my Lord, I’ve got a damn Amish fellow for a judge!’“They fear a bit of old-fashioned stern justice may be about to come down on them,” Carol Bailey says.And when the couple travels around the state to attend storytelling events, many people ask her: “Is he really a judge?” April 15, 2006 Regular News Yarn-spinning judge keeps history alive Bailey’s storytelling fosters Florida’s unique sense of place Yarn-spinning judge keeps history alivelast_img read more

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Who Let The Trolls Out: Long Island Press Journalists Read “Fan” Mail [Video]

first_imgThe Long Island Press editorial staff has been the recipient of countless letters, emails and social media comments throughout the years from readers who simply had to weigh in on our award-winning, tell-it-like-it-is brand of journalism, pull-no-punches opinion pieces and eclectic team of truth-seekers.Some of that correspondence can be described as pseudo love letters, wherein the sender gushes about this or that coverage, their thrill over our last take-down, or tips on who or what should be the subject of a future piece. Others–well, not so much. They feel it important to share their two cents and offer critiques on everything from our overall writing and viewpoints to our sentence structure and punctuation choices. Some focus their spite on specific writers. One woman felt compelled to sent a thousand-plus word crucifixion of the as-yet-to-be-released new Star Wars movie. May the force be with her.Regardless of their stances, the Press welcomes all.Inspired by Jimmy Kimmel’s “Mean Tweets” segment, we decided to produce our own video in which Press reporters read a few of the comments sent along to us from not-so-happy readers.So, here’s a peek inside what one distressed reader dubbed our “tiny office in Garden City” where “10 people” were “appointed…experts on U.S. politics,” doling out what another deemed “mindless, partisan agit-prop.”Enjoy, dear readers. Enjoy. We raise a glass of freshly brewed coffee to you with our sincere, unending love. Why? Because you read us.“Pravda!” we sing. “To pravda.” [Russian for “The Truth”]Keep ’em coming, and Happy New Year! Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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State-owned banks restructure loans worth US$8 billion

first_imgAccording to Himbara’s data, Bank Rakyat Indonesia (BRI) restructured the largest number of loans totaling Rp 57.73 trillion to 693,615 borrowers, followed by Bank Negara Indonesia (BNI), which restructured Rp 39.45 trillion in loans to more than 50,000 borrowers.Bank Mandiri, meanwhile, restructured a total of Rp 19.04 trillion in loans to 63,202 borrowers with the biggest loans being in the consumer and wholesale segments as the bank is more focused on corporate and wholesale clients.At the same time, mortgage-focused lender Bank Tabungan Negara (BTN) restructured a total of Rp 4.6 trillion in loans to almost 25,000 borrowers, mostly subsidized mortgage clients.Following President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s recent instruction to prioritize loan restructuring for MSMEs amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Sunarso said the state-controlled banks were ready to ease loan principal and interest payments.“We have prepared several loan relaxation and restructuring schemes to ease their burden during this pandemic,” added Sunarso, who is also president director of BRI.The schemes include postponing loan and interest payments, as well as lowering interest rates, Sunarso said, in line with government announcement on Wednesday. The state-owned lenders will also allow corporate debtors to reschedule their payments should they receive hits from the spread of the coronavirus to their businesses.The government has unveiled subsidies to cover loan interest ranging from 2 to 6 percent for millions of borrowers in the micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) segment, the backbone of the Indonesian economy. Micro lenders will also be able to delay their loan repayments for up to six months.Topics : State-owned banks have restructured more than Rp 120.86 trillion (US$ 8.05 billion) in loans to over 832,000 borrowers in an effort to curb the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on businesses and individuals.State-Owned Lenders Association (Himbara) chairman Sunarso said on Thursday that of all the borrowers, around 96 percent, or 801,000, came from the micro, small and medium segments accounting for Rp 87.36 trillion, 72 percent of the restructured loans. The remaining restructured loans were from the consumer and wholesale segments.“This includes small and medium enterprises [SMEs], micro loans, subsidized housing loans and the government micro credit program [KUR],” Sunarso told House of Representatives’ Commission VI overseeing state-owned enterprises (SOEs), trade and investment.last_img read more

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Cabinet approves military funeral for Corporal Marian George Jno Lewis

first_img Sharing is caring! Tweet Share 396 Views   2 comments Sharecenter_img LocalNews Cabinet approves military funeral for Corporal Marian George Jno Lewis by: – December 9, 2011 Share Corporal Marian Jno. Lewis. Photo credit: Dominica Source The Commonwealth of Dominica Police Force has announced that Cabinet has approved a military funeral for Corporal Marian George Jno Lewis of Salisbury on Saturday 10th December, 2011.Corporal Jno. Lewis who battled with leukemia for several months, died at the age of forty-one at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Barbados on Friday 25th November, 2011 and her body was escorted to Dominica by the Regional Security Systems on Saturday 28th November, 2011.According to a news release by the Police Force, “Wednesday 7th December to Saturday 10th December, 2011 have been declared as National Days of Mourning and National flags shall be flown at half-mast on all Police Stations during that period.”The body of Corporal Marian George Jno. Lewis will be laid for viewing at the Police Headquarters from 12:00 to 2:00 on Friday 9th December, 2011 with public viewing from 1:30 pm.Body of Corporal Marian George Jno. Lewis being escorted at the Melvine Hall AirportThe body will also be laid for viewing on Saturday at the St. Theresa’s Roman Catholic Church in Salisbury from 2:00 to 2:30pm and the funeral service will commence at 2:30 pm to be followed by interment at the St. Theresa’s Roman Catholic Cemetery.As part of the military funeral Corporal Jno Lewis will receive twenty-one gun salutes.The Government Music Lover’s Band is also expected to play at the service.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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Australian Open: Smoke delays unlikely, say organisers

first_imgSmoke from bushfires is unlikely to delay the Australian Open tennis Grand Slam, organisers said on Tuesday, insisting they have pulled out all the stops to protect the health and safety of players. With the opening major of 2020 due to start at January 20, Melbourne has been blanketed by haze in recent days from blazes burning to the east – part of Australia’s bushfire crisis that has left 25 people dead. Australian Open defending champion Novak Djokovic has said smoke delays cannot be ruled out Novak Djokovic, president of the ATP players council, said organisers should consider delaying the tournament, as a last resort, if conditions did not improve. But Tennis Australia chief Craig Tiley said he did not see this as likely. “There has been a lot of speculation about whether the smoke from the bushfires will affect the Australian Open,” he said. “All the information we have at the moment, with qualifying coming up next week, is that the forecast is good, we don’t expect any delays and we’ve implemented additional measures to ensure the Australian Open will be able to run as scheduled.” Tiley said that while images of the fires, which have destroyed hundreds of properties, were distressing, there was no danger to people in Melbourne. “The closest fires are several hundred kilometres (miles) from the city,” he said, while stressing that the health and safety of players, staff and fans was a priority. “We’ve committed substantial extra resources to analysis, monitoring and logistics to ensure this throughout the tournament,” he said. Promoted ContentThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The World6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year8 Things That Will Happen If An Asteroid Hits EarthWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooBest Car Manufacturers In The World6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better10 Stunning Asian Actresses No Man Can Resist8 Amazing Facts About Ancient Egypt World number one Rafael Nadal indicated he would be one of the players taking part in a fund-raising exhibition match for fire victims ahead of the Australian Open Every ace hit at the tournament will see Aus$100 ($69) donated to victims, while several players have individually pledged more. Tennis Australia has also arranged a fund-raising exhibition match at Melbourne’s Rod Laver Arena on January 15, ahead of the Australian Open, with “the world’s top players” taking part. World number one Rafael Nadal indicated he would be one of them, calling the bushfire devastation “a super-sad situation”. “From my side we will do things to try to raise money for this terrible thing… so I am here to help in any way that is possible and I’m sure we will be able to, together with the rest of the players, help to raise important money for this disaster,” Nadal said. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… “There will be meteorological and air quality experts on site to analyse all available live data and assess in real-time the air quality at Melbourne Park, and we always work closely with our medical personnel and other local experts.” – ‘Super-sad’ – Any smoke hazards would be treated in a similar way to extreme heat and rain, with umpires able to stop play if air monitoring shows it is too dangerous to continue. But as Melbourne Park has three roofed stadiums and eight other indoor courts, the chances of major delays appear minimal. The fires have been a key talking point at the ongoing ATP Cup in Sydney, Brisbane and Perth with tennis stars and other sports personalities getting behind a drive to raise money to help.last_img read more

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Indiana Pork Donates to State Food Bank

first_imgNon-profit Indiana Pork donates 7500 pounds of pork to food bank.INDIANAPOLIS –Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana has received a donation from Indiana Pork.In partnership with the Indiana State Department of Agriculture and Feeding Indiana’s Hungry, the group donated 7,500 pounds of ground pork to the food bank.The donation is possible through a successful fundraising campaign during the state fair.Indiana Pork is a not-for-profit association representing Indiana’s 3,000 family pork farmers.last_img read more

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Keane keeps focus on team goals

first_img The 34-year-old Republic of Ireland skipper helped himself to a hat-trick with a clinical display of finishing in Saturday evening’s 7-0 demolition of Gibraltar to take his tally in European qualifiers to 21, one more than Turkey’s Hakan Sukur. In the process, he increased his record career total for Ireland to 65, just three fewer than West Germany legend Gerd Muller and six behind Miroslav Klose, who recently announced his retirement from international football. Robbie Keane modestly shrugged off his goalscoring feats after establishing himself as the top marksman in European Championship qualifying history. But Keane, who famously rarely remembers details of the games in which he has played, later insisted personal milestones were not at the forefront of his mind. Asked if he was aware of the company he is keeping, he said: “I get messages from people telling me – my brother tells me all the time. “He texts me and my mates text me, but I genuinely couldn’t tell you who’s even close to me on it. That’s being honest. I know Klose – that’s as far as I know. “Honestly, I don’t really think about it. Like I said, I get messages from people, but personally I don’t really think about it. “I never think about what’s happened before, I never think about what’s going to happen in the future because I can’t predict what’s going to happen in the future. “The past is the past. I scored those goals, but I’m so focused on what I’m doing now that I’m not really interested in anybody else, to be honest.” Keane made his senior international debut as a 17-year-old against the Czech Republic in March 1998, and scored for the first time in a green shirt against Malta in the October of the same year. Former strike-partner Niall Quinn, whose then record of 21 goals he surpassed a decade ago to the day on Monday, knew from those early days that the Republic had a real talent on their hands, but the Los Angeles Galaxy hitman’s record is little short of phenomenal. Keane, who has nevertheless attracted criticism for his performances at times in recent years, is the nation’s most-capped player with his latest hat-trick marking a 136th appearance, and he has insisted he will keep on turning up for as long as he is wanted and feels able to contribute. Defender John O’Shea has little doubt how important the Dubliner remains to his country. O’Shea said: “People will obviously crib because they are desperate to knock Robbie as soon as they can, but believe me he is an absolute legend, purely because of his goalscoring, his finishing. “He still has to put those chances away, in the right place at the right time. He’s a special, special player and still will be for years to come.” In the short term, the focus for both men is a trip to Gelsenkirchen and Tuesday’s Euro 2016 qualifier against World champions Germany, who slipped to a shock 2-0 defeat in Poland as Ireland were making merry against Gibraltar. Keane said: “It’s a tough game, completely different. Obviously the opposition it’s going to be a tough test. “Before this game [Gibraltar], our main aim was to get six points going into the Germany game and we’ve done that, so we’re going into the Germany game with a lot of confidence. “Make no mistake, we can go there and get something out of that game, there’s no question about that.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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