Chicago businessman buys Indiana Beach amusement park

first_img Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Previous articleMore than 6 million pieces of personal protective equipment sourced from Hoosier businessesNext articleIndiana confirmed COVID-19 cases nearing 14,500 Associated PressNews from the Associated Press and its network of reporters and publications. Google+ Google+ (Source: https://goo.gl/jKtnJJ License: https://goo.gl/sZ7V7x) MONTICELLO, Ind. (AP) — A Chicago businessman has bought a northern Indiana amusement park that abruptly closed in February and hopes to reopen the 94-year-old tourist destination’s rides and other attractions this summer if coronavirus restrictions allow.White County Commissioner John Heimlich said Thursday that Gene Staples purchased Indiana Beach before its former owner, California-based Apex Parks Group, declared Chapter 11 bankruptcy on April 8.Apex had announced in February that it had shuttered the site along Lake Shafer in Monticellos.Staples said in a statement that he’s excited “to be part of a new era for Monticello.” IndianaNews WhatsApp By Associated Press – April 25, 2020 0 294 Pinterest Pinterest Chicago businessman buys Indiana Beach amusement parklast_img read more

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Bremen man sentenced to 300 years behind bars for molestation

first_img WhatsApp By Jon Zimney – November 20, 2020 3 500 Twitter IndianaLocalNews Facebook Facebook Google+ Bremen man sentenced to 300 years behind bars for molestation Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Pinterest (Photo supplied) A Bremen man accused of molesting his girlfriend’s daughter and niece has been sentenced to 300 years behind bars.Ricardo Vasquez was found guilty on ten counts of child molesting.His sentence included a sentence enhancement for being a repeat sex offender.During their investigation, Bremen police learned Vasquez had been living under the alias ‘Rick Bane’ for nearly 9 years in order to escape a warrant for a child molesting conviction in Georgia. Google+ Previous articleBeacon Health System searching for refrigerated truck as COVID-19 cases riseNext articlePolice investigating shooting at Indian Springs Apartments Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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Sleater-Kinney Shares First Track From St. Vincent-Produced New Album, Adds Tour Dates [Listen]

first_imgThe new track, “Hurry On Home”, arrived along with an iPhone-stylized lyric video directed by Miranda July. The track begins with a gospel vocal swell before dropping into the band’s characteristically emotive gritty rock drive. St. Vincent’s surreal sonics are also apparent throughout the song, providing the first peek at the fruits of this high-powered collaboration. You can find the new Sleater-Kinney track on the streaming service of your choice here or give it a listen below:Sleater-Kinney – “Hurry On Home” [Official Lyric Video][Video: Sleater-Kinney]The new project marks Sleater-Kinney’s first studio album since their 2015 comeback LP, No Cities to Love. The trio, comprised of Corin Tucker, Janet Weiss, and Carrie Brownstein, reformed in 2014 following a nearly decade-long hiatus, during which Brownstein earned a new name for herself in the comedy world for her work on Portlandia with Fred Armisen.In addition to releasing the new single, the band announced a number of tour dates that will keep them on the road throughout much of this coming October and November. You can check out a full list of Sleater-Kinney’s upcoming tour dates below or head to the band’s website for more information.Sleater-Kinney Upcoming Tour Dates09/05-07 – Raleigh, NC @ Hopscotch Music Festival10/09 – Spokane, WA @ Fox Theatre10/11 – Boise, ID @ Knitting Factory Concert House10/12 – Salt Lake City, UT @ The Depot10/13 – Denver, CO @ Ogden Theatre10/15 – Minneapolis, MN @ Palace Theatre10/16 – Milwaukee, WI @ Riverside Theater10/18 – Chicago, IL @ Riviera Theatre10/20 – Louisville, KY @ Old Forester’s Paristown Hall10/21 – Nashville, TN @ Ryman Auditorium10/23 – Atlanta, GA @ Tabernacle10/25 – Washington, DC @ The Anthem10/26 – Pittsburgh, PA @ Stage AE10/27 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Fillmore10/29 – Boston, MA @ House of Blues10/30 – Brooklyn, NY @ Kings Theatre10/31 – New York, NY @ Hammerstein Ballroom11/01 – Columbus, OH @ Newport Music Hall11/03 – Toronto, ON @ Rebel Complex11/04 – Detroit, MI @ Majestic Theatre11/05 – St. Louis, MO @ The Pageant11/07 – Houston, TX @ House of Blues11/08 – Dallas, TX @ House of Blues11/09 – Austin, TX @ ACL Live at Moody Theater11/11 – Phoenix, AZ @ The Van Buren11/12 – San Diego, CA @ The Observatory North Park11/13 – Santa Ana, CA @ The Observatory OC11/14 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/16 – Oakland, CA @ Fox Theater11/19 – Portland, OR @ Crystal Ballroom11/21 – Vancouver, BC @ Commodore Ballroom11/23 – Seattle, WA @ Paramount TheatreView Upcoming Tour Dates[H/T Consequence of Sound] The first track from the forthcoming Sleater-Kinney album produced by St. Vincent (a.k.a. Annie Clark) has finally arrived.last_img read more

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Farish A. Jenkins Jr., 72

first_imgWhether it was digging in the Canadian Arctic, providing guidance to colleagues, or spending hours producing chalkboard illustrations for the next day’s lecture, Farish A. Jenkins Jr. was deeply committed to probing the mysteries of evolutionary biology, while engaging and inspiring his students — a number of whom would become his colleagues.Jenkins, a Harvard professor of biology for more than 40 years, and Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and curator of vertebrate paleontology at the University’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, was a mentor and friend to many. His death at age 72 on Nov. 11, brought sadness to the Harvard community and beyond.“In a University full of unique individuals, he was certainly one of a kind,” said James Hanken, Harvard professor of biology and director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology.Jenkins was a distinguished vertebrate paleontologist, renowned for his fieldwork, who made seminal discoveries in respiratory physiology, bird flight, and the evolution of the earliest mammals.But Jenkins was just as well known for his engaging lectures, and the advice and counsel he gave to students and colleagues.“His lectures were really performances,” said Andrew A. Biewener, Harvard professor of biology. “He was just so engaging and a true gentleman in the way he approached relationships. He was a great teacher, an outstanding scholar, and someone who was always willing to provide sound advice and guidance to his colleagues.”A.W. Crompton, a Harvard professor emeritus of biology, had a hand in bringing Jenkins to Harvard in 1971. Crompton had Jenkins as a student at Yale University and agreed with others who said Jenkins’ lectures were “high-spirited,” but no less informative, according to Crompton.“He was a fantastic teacher, and the list of students he made an impression on goes on and on,” Crompton said.Crompton said Jenkins delivered his famous “Moby Dick” lecture while wearing a peg leg, reciting lines from the book, and mimicking Captain Ahab plodding along the decks as the crew listened below.“It was his way of demonstrating the elements of human locomotion,” Crompton said. “There are those who have said about his lectures, ‘They may not remember a word he said, but they will never forget him.’ But all of this is not to say his lectures were not informative. He did take things very seriously, and he could be tough. Once he took up an opinion, he stuck to that opinion.”Jenkins was also known to spend hours producing illustrations on the chalkboard for a lecture the next day.“He was also a tremendous artist,” Hanken said, “and he even used a pencil sharpener for his chalk so he could produce these lush illustrations.”Outside of the classroom, Jenkins was famous for his work in the field, which took him across the globe to East Africa, Greenland, and the American West. His discoveries included Tiktaalik roseae, the 375 million-year-old fossil of a fishlike creature, which Jenkins and colleagues called the missing link between fish and four-legged animals.Neil Shubin, a professor at the University of Chicago, was a student of Jenkins at Harvard and would go on to spend 30 years in the field with his mentor and friend. Shubin was with Jenkins on Ellesmere Island in Nunavut Territory, Canada, when they discovered Tiktaalik roseae.“He loved discovery and relished life. We would be suffering like dogs out in the field, and he would look at you and say, ‘How lucky are we?’ He was just hilarious, and after 30 years of working in the field with him, I look back and think about there being just one funny thing after another, even though we were in extreme conditions,” Shubin said.Looking for fossils in the Arctic can be “like looking for a needle in a haystack,” Shubin said, but Jenkins was able to be a part of some amazing discoveries because of his meticulous preparation and tenacity.“He just loved fieldwork, and he was smart about it. He made his own luck,” Shubin said. “He was absolutely tenacious. There were years where we failed to find anything, but he was able to learn from those failures. And he had the great sense to know when to quit or when to stick it out.”Steve Gatesy, a Brown University professor and another student-turned-colleague, spent several seasons in the field with Jenkins.“Farish was just so amazing. He could go from standing in front of a Harvard anatomy class, wearing a white lab coat, and then the next thing you know he would be back on campus with his dapper suit. Then you would see him using the X-ray machine, with a lead robe on. And then he would be out in the field, covered in mud and carrying a rifle,” said Gatesy. “In fact, someone out in Montana who met him for the first time would have thought he was a cowboy or rancher rather than a Harvard professor. But that was Farish.”Gatesy was with Jenkins and Shubin on Ellesmere Island, and is the one who dug up the Tiktaalik.“In many ways, Farish was an old-fashioned guy, and I say that because he had an old-fashioned work ethic. He wanted to get it right, even if it took a long time, which is the opposite of today’s turn-it-out-quickly science. That is what was so refreshing about Farish,” said Gatesy. “When he would go out in the field, he would say that it’s going to take two or three years to get our bearings, then we will know where to look, and then we may get lucky.”“He was all about quality, which is so refreshing,” Gatesy added.Also known for excellent posture and impeccable attire, Jenkins left a large mark on Harvard and the world of vertebrate paleontology.He received his bachelor’s degree in geology from Princeton University, and then served several years in the Marine Corps. After the Marines, Jenkins earned a master’s degree and a Ph.D. from Yale.He began his teaching career at Columbia University, but he went to Harvard in 1971, attracted by the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and the revitalization of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Jenkins also taught anatomy in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.“That was a very high-level course, with physicians and medical research people, and almost everyone who took that course said it was probably the best course they ever had,” Crompton said.Jenkins called himself a “hybrid”: an anatomist, zoologist, and vertebrate paleontologist.“He was not just a straight paleontologist, because he did a lot with anatomy, and how living animals function, and how that relates to fossils. Because of that, he helped to change paleontology from a dull description of fossils to something that’s alive,” Crompton said.James McCarthy, Harvard professor of biological oceanography, called Jenkins “the epitome of a Harvard professor.”“He was a true gentleman with impeccable manners, and he loved Harvard. He cared deeply for his students, and he was for many of them the best teacher they would ever know. He was a superb scientist, and a model University citizen. Every pursuit received 100 percent of his effort, and he expected the same of his students and his faculty colleagues,” McCarthy said. “He enjoyed life to the fullest, whether teaching human anatomy at the Medical School, digging for fossils in Greenland, or tending his antique apple orchard on his farm in New Hampshire. Moreover, he delighted in helping others to enjoy life as he did.”Jenkins met his wife, Eleanor, while he was a student at Princeton. The two lived for several years in Arlington, and also owned that rural apple farm.In addition to his wife, Jenkins leaves a brother, Henry Edgar II of Sausalito, Calif.; a son, Henry Edgar III of Denver; a daughter, Katherine Temperance Leeds of Watertown, Mass.; and two grandchildren.last_img read more

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The watchword is innovation

first_imgThis is the third of four reports echoing key themes of The Harvard Campaign, examining what the University is accomplishing in those areas.  Innovation? That was not always one of Harvard’s goals. When it opened in the 17th century, New England’s first college was an institution for educating ministers and lawyers, offering a sound classical curriculum, with facility in Latin required for entering freshmen.In recent decades, “Harvard” and “innovation” have melded to such a degree that those two words might well be spelled the same. Pressing for the new to solve the old has entered the fabric of the curriculum, from Harvard’s strong humanities and the arts (where digital frontiers are being breached) to its probing sciences, whether pure, applied, or social.“Harvard is about possibilities,” said President Drew Faust in her remarks Sept. 10 opening the academic year. “Here, it’s possible to change how our successors will think about learning and teaching.” She delivered similar comments in launching The Harvard Campaign last Saturday.The Harvard innovation picture can reflect a solo effort, as in the case of Olenka Polak ’15, whose app, myLINGO, can translate foreign movies in real time. Or innovation can be a team effort — the mainstay of bench science — like the work of a group run by chemical biologist Xiaoliang Sunney Xie that is investigating life forces at the level of single molecules in live cells.Some innovations are the province of Harvard institutions. They can have likely names, such as the i-lab, which stands for Harvard Innovation Lab, a University-wide, border-breaking engine of interdisciplinary creativity. Another is the Government Innovators Network at the Harvard Kennedy School’s (HKS) Ash Center. There are innovation-driven entrepreneurship centers at Harvard Business School (HBS), and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).In such places, Faust said, Harvard’s entrepreneurs “are building apps and businesses and cultural enterprises.”HBS, in fact, pioneered the use decades ago of the case study method, which gives students real-world business scenarios and asks them to come up with their own solutions to problems. It is a system that dovetails well in encouraging an entrepreneurial mindset.Engineers out at the edgeSEAS is pronounced “seize,” as in, seize every opportunity to make the new and remake the old. Research projects under way there include developing a soft and wearable “exosuit” that supports the human body while carrying heavy loads (from Conor Walsh) and adaptive camouflage inspired by cuttlefish (from Joanna Aizenberg). Over the summer, a new student group called Nanostart began creating a community around nanoscale innovation and entrepreneurship. Graduate students, researchers, and companies come together to brainstorm inventions.Courses at SEAS point right at innovation. This semester, the traditional ES 96 (a required junior-level design course for concentrators in the engineering sciences) will take on therapeutic uses for manufactured human cells. The goal of ES 96, as always, is to teach design theory through a hands-on project.That touches on another leitmotif within Faust’s semester-opening remarks, her call for “expanded opportunities for hands-on experimental learning.”This fall, SEAS is offering a new course that points to the future: ES 27, “Digital Interfaces for Collaborative and Participatory Design,” a joint listing for SEAS and the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD).As a design school, GSD is a place where the future of the built environment is first imagined. But it is also a place of teaching innovations. Many students are driven by an intensive system of required studio courses that demand an eclectic mix of experts, from engineering and ecology to model-building and drawing. (Next spring there will be a GSD course called “Landscape and Painting,” in which student designers sharpen their visual wits by working in oils and acrylics.) In the field, GSD is also breaking ground on some research study sites by teaming graduate students in anthropology and design.At the core, collaborationFaust reminded her audience of innovative learning collaborations like that novel pairing. She even gave Harvard’s academic collaboration a new locus of its own. Allston, said Faust, is “a place where we can experiment with the increased fluidity of boundaries between fields and Schools, and between the University and the wider world.”In the names of still other Harvard institutions, innovation is implied. There is the Digital Arts and Humanities Committee, for instance, an arm of the Arts and Humanities Division. Not long ago, putting “digital” and “arts” together would have sounded like a typo, but today it describes a creative frontier of crisscrossing boundaries. There are 15 departments on that committee, along with 15 museums or other centers, five undergraduate degree concentrations, and a scattering of related programs.Though the Semitic Museum often pores over the past, it offers digital exhibits — not bad for an institution founded in 1889 — and landmark initiatives in digital publishing for archaeology and data management, part of the Shelby White and Leon Levy Program for Archaeological Publications. The museum’s director, Peter Der Manuelian, the Philip J. King Professor of Egyptology, keeps the Harvard Giza Project on a digital cutting edge. Showing 3-D virtual worlds, he can lead students on tours of the Giza Plateau as it was 4,500 years ago, skimming over pyramids, then plunging into burial chambers.Visualization is at the heart of another example of innovation, the interactive FloTree at the Harvard Museum of Natural History. This interactive touch-table allows users to explore interconnecting evolutionary patterns in flora and fauna with the swipe of a finger. It was developed at the Scientists’ Discovery Room Lab at SEAS, directed by Chia Shen, the principal investigator for the federally funded Life on Earth project.Going small, going bigIn addition, at Harvard many small-scale, little-known innovations display boundless creativity. A springtime design and project fair in the Science Center Plaza, for example, showcased: a basketball hoop that keeps score; a laser harp; a mind-controlled car; a one-wheeled, self-balancing electric vehicle; an automatic fish feeder; and a math system for crowdsourcing stock picks. Students from the popular ES 50 course wandered through the crowd, wearing T-shirts that said, “Trust me: I’m almost an electrical engineer.”Earlier this year, two students in the SEAS “Design Survivor” course created a tear-shaped travel mug that can’t tip over. Two undergraduates in a SEAS course called “Design of Usable Interactive Systems” created an apt app for their ages: It tracks drinking behavior.Other Harvard innovations were more speculative, pointing to applications on a farther horizon. Consider Assistant Professor Sharad Ramanathan’s remote-controlled worms, for instance. His team at the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology used targeted lasers to manipulate neurons in the brains of tiny, transparent C. elegans. Their novel investigation technique not only guided wiggling worms but also may help to unravel how the human nervous system works.Teaching, learning, evolvingThere have been innovations in pedagogy too. This spring, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) introduced an innovation to make fledgling scholars better communicators. In September, GSAS underscored its commitment to innovation in research, graduate study, and the changing future of dissertations. It held an open house about its new Ph.D. secondary field degree in critical media practice, which encourages digital projects that complement written work and break the mold of a text-bound scholarly hurdle as old as print and paper.Then there is [email protected], a place for creating, as its mission statement says, “innovative scenarios for the future of knowledge creation and dissemination in the arts and humanities.” Last fall, metaLAB affiliates created the “Labrary,” a student-designed, pop-up space on Mount Auburn Street. On display were artifacts hinting at what libraries of the future might look like. There was a retreat-like, inflatable Mylar tent, a bench that was part boom box, and a one-legged “unsteady stool” to keep the user alert.In April, the Digital Public Library of America launched a beta version of its discovery portal, opening a free-access digital archive of 2.4 million works. The project, a virtual network of national and local libraries, started two years ago at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, itself an innovation machine.The Berkman Center developed H2O, an educational exchange platform for creating, editing, and sharing course materials electronically in collaboration with the Harvard Law School Library. But H2O will not always be “law-specific,” said law professor and center co-founder Jonathan Zittrain. Available in sharable electronic form, the new format could offer what he called “an intellectual playlist” of online materials widely used — and collaboratively assembled and vetted — by students and professors in any discipline.“Technology promises both wondrous possibilities and profound dislocations,” said Faust in her semester-opening remarks. Then she mentioned two entities that foster innovation.The Harvard Initiative for Teaching and Learning, now in its third year, is designed to accelerate the new and the best in those areas. So far, 150 faculty, students, and staff have gotten support from HILT. Then there is HarvardX, now in its second year. So far, nearly 60 faculty members are either offering or preparing courses widely available on line.This fall the Harvard Kennedy School will offer HKS211.1X, an eight-week, experimental-format class open to 500 students online and to 50 in the traditional classroom setting. The idea is to investigate and analyze options for addressing three of America’s most pressing foreign policy concerns, “each of them, in effect, problems from hell,” said co-teacher Graham Allison in an introductory video: a possible incursion into Syria, concern over Iran’s nuclear program, and the rise of China to mighty power.As for the new format, Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and the Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, added a comment that sums up both the hope and the trepidation that innovation contains. “The ‘X’ in the course,” he said, “stands for experimental.”In her remarks, Faust picked up on the same two-edged threshold that connects the sturdy past to the innovative future. Teaching and learning at Harvard will “both preserve what Harvard has been,” she said, and “evolve to meet the demands of these changing times.”last_img read more

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Interview With VADM Joseph D. Kernan

first_imgBy Dialogo July 20, 2011 Vice Admiral Joseph D. Kernan assumed his duties as the U.S. Southern Command Military Deputy Commander in May 2011, and ever since has been on an almost non-stop tour throughout the 16 million square mile area of Central America, South America, and the Caribbean to get better acquainted with the region. The former US 4th Fleet commander made sure to stop in Brazil exactly at the same time the country is hosting the 5th Military World Games and took the time to speak with Diálogo about this major event. Diálogo – In what way do the Military World Games promote security cooperation throughout the region? VADM Kernan: Bringing athletes and delegations together from over 100 nations for sports competitions offers personal interaction that builds friendships and relations among those that all serve the security and well being of their respective nations. Many will be future leaders in their countries and military. Those relations established at events of this nature will serve to build the trust and confidence to work together in common interests. Brazil has named these the “Peace Games”, underscoring the notion that the collective theme for our militaries is global security and peace. As we can engage in friendly competition so to can we partner and promote a safe and peaceful world. Diálogo – What’s the importance to the region the fact that the MWG are to be held for the first time in a Latin-America country (Brazil)? VADM Kernan: Hosting the games in this region, and specifically Brazil, offers the world an opportunity to experience Brazil’s hospitality and better appreciate the region’s importance in the global environment. The high value Brazil and the region places on building relations that contribute to global peace, prosperity, and cultural diversity will resonate with every participating nation. Furthermore, as I just mentioned, with the “Peace Games” theme, it further demonstrates precisely what Brazil has shown all of us both domestically and internationally – that a strong military can promote peace through an effective application of “soft power”. So what more appropriate place to hold them than in Brazil, particularly as they continue to emerge as a global leader. Diálogo – To the U.S. military athletes, how important are the MWG and how do they feel to have the chance to compete with and exchange experiences with their counterparts in the region? VADM Kernan: Competitions of this nature are as much about connecting with counterparts and establishing personal relationships as they are about friendly competition. The competitions will end, the relationships and mutual respect gained through sport will endure and likely offer productive professional and security-based engagements in the future. We are first connected by our profession, serving the security interests of our nations. Personal interaction will only foster our ability to work together for common interests. Having participated in CISM as a young officer, I remember more the camaraderie with the fellow athletes from many countries to include Brazil and others from this region, than I do the actual results of the competition. Diálogo – U.S. participated in the Solidarity Travel Plan cooperating with the seats on their military planes, helping other countries that otherwise would not be able to participate in the MWG. What other measure – if any – did the US take in cooperation with other nations regarding the MWG? VADM Kernan: We are always open to cooperating with other countries to ensure the success of events of this nature. We did help to provide transportation for athletes from several regional nations so they could compete and experience the many benefits of these Military World Games. We were very willing to provide airlift support for these nations to compete when they otherwise might not have been able to for lack of transportation. The more countries that participate, the more benefit for all. Brazil has done an extraordinary job orchestrating all aspects of this international event, hosting nearly 9,000 athletes and spectators anticipated to number nearly 400,000. Brazil has created the venue for the “Peace Games”; it is now up to participating countries to reap the benefits. Diálogo – Are there any plans for the U.S. to host the MWG in the near future? VADM Kernan: I am not aware of any plans for the U.S. to host the Games in the future. We certainly enjoy participation in countries outside of the U.S. and gain the benefits of experiencing different cultures and expanding relations with host and competing countries. But I’m certain that if we ever do host them we will look to the outstanding organization and execution of these games in Brazil as a model to follow.last_img read more

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Study yields mixed findings about microbes on organic produce

first_img Diez-Gonzalez said the findings contradict the impression from media reports that organic produce is more likely to cause illness than conventional produce is. The study was published this month in the Journal of Food Protection. The study also showed that produce from certified organic farms was less likely to have fecal contamination, as represented by nonpathogenic Escherichia coli, than produce from uncertified farms. Certified organic farms are required to follow federal guidelines designed to minimize the risk of pathogens in manure used as fertilizer, according to the study’s senior author, Francisco Diez-Gonzalez, PhD, of the University of Minnesota in St. Paul. May 19, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – A recent comparative study of organic and conventionally grown produce on farms in Minnesota showed that the organic produce was virtually free of pathogenic bacteria but was more likely to have fecal contamination from manure used as fertilizer. E coli was 19 times more prevalent in produce from organic farms that used manure or compost less than a year old as fertilizer, compared with organic farms that used older materials, according to the report. In addition, E coli was found 2.4 times more often on produce from organic farms that used cattle manure as compared with farms using other kinds of manure. Among types of produce, organic lettuce had the highest E coli contamination, at 22% of samples (12 of 49). Craig Hedberg, PhD, a foodborne disease expert and associate professor of environmental and occupational health at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, said a limitation of the study is that it dealt only with Minnesota, which is not a major producer of fruits and vegetables. “It may be relevant to a broader question, but the results aren’t all that generalizable to the world at large,” he said. “The media have portrayed that organic vegetables have a lot of foodborne pathogens. Our data doesn’t support that,” he told CIDRAP News. “But it does seem to confirm the belief that it [organic produce] is more susceptible to fecal contamination. The good news is that if you are certified, your chance of fecal contamination decreases significantly.” Diez-Gonzalez is an assistant professor of food science and nutrition in the university’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences and the College of Human Ecology. Diez-Gonzalez said agencies that certify organic farms require them to follow US Department of Agriculture organic farming guidelines designed to eliminate pathogens in manure used as fertilizer. The guidelines deal with minimum temperature for composted manure and the minimum time interval between manure application and harvest. Manure that is not composted may not be used less than 120 days before harvest for crops in close contact with the soil and and 90 days before harvest for other crops, he said. However, he said the guidelines don’t say anything about how old manure should be before it is used. Previous studies comparing organic and conventional produce have focused on produce in stores rather than on farms, whereas Diez-Gonzalez and three colleagues collected produce from the fields. “The reason we did this was to try to answer the question whether the organic practices at the farm had a great impact on the prevalence of the microorganisms,” he said. “Ours is the first study that suggests a potential association between organic certification and reduced E. coli prevalence,” the report says. “Further research is recommended to confirm this finding.”center_img No E coli O157:H7 or other pathogenic E coli strains were found in any of the produce samples, the report says. But Salmonella was found in one organic lettuce sample and one organic green pepper from separate farms. “Based on the absence of E coli O157:H7 and the very low Salmonella prevalence, the assertion that organic produce has greater pathogen contamination does not seem to be supported,” the article says. However, Hedberg said the finding that the use of manure less than a year old was linked with more E coli contamination on produce is probably important. “Organic farmers might want to look at this and say, ‘I have to look at how I manage my manure before I use it,'” he said. Ordinary E coli was found in 9.7% of organic produce samples, versus 1.6% of the conventional produce, a significant difference, according to the report. However, E coli prevalence in produce from certified organic farms was 4.3%, which was not significantly higher than the level in conventional produce. The E coli prevalence in produce from uncertified organic farms was 11.4%, significantly higher than in the certified organic produce. In addition, 59% of uncertified organic farms had at least one sample with E coli contamination, versus only 12% of certified organic farms. Farmers were recruited for the study at workshops and through personal visits and phone contacts. The researchers collected 476 produce samples from 32 organic farms and 129 samples from eight conventional farms, all in central and southern Minnesota. Eight of the organic farms were certified by accredited agencies; the rest were not certified but reported using organic practices. All of the organic farmers reported using manure as their main fertilizer, and four of the conventional farmers used manure in addition to chemical fertilizer. Mukherjee A, Speh D, Dyck E, et al. Preharvest evaluation of coliforms, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in organic and conventional produce grown by Minnesota farmers. J Food Prot 2004;67(5):894-900 [Abstract] Diez-Gonzalez said the current findings were from the first year of a 3-year study that began 2 years ago. The second year of the study yielded no findings of E coli O157:H7 or Salmonella on organic produce samples, though those findings have not yet been published, he said. Produce samples that were analyzed included tomatoes, leafy greens, lettuce, green peppers, cabbage, cucumbers, broccoli, strawberries, apples, and several other items. The samples were not washed before being analyzed.last_img read more

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Milan High School/Middle School get new locks

first_imgMilan, IN—  As the 2019-20 school year begins, the teachers in the high school/middle school building should feel more secure this year.  Over the summer, new locks were installed on all classroom doors in the high school/middle school building replacing locks that were several years old.  The new classroom locks are electronic and the access card teachers use to gain entry into the building will also be used to lock and unlock their classrooms.  In addition, each classroom has a remote control about the size of a garage door opener teachers can use to lock their classroom doors remotely from anywhere in the room.  The new lock system also allows the school resource officer to lock down every classroom in the building simultaneously with a couple of mouse clicks from his computer.The locks are ArchiTech locks by Networx purchased through Marshall Best Security out of Fishers, IN.  Though the entire system operates electronically, each lock operates independently on battery power.  Once the lock has been programmed for access, any access card that has been programmed to operate that lock will still work even if there is a power outage.  These are the same type of locks installed on the Milan Elementary School classroom doors last fall.   The total cost of the project was $55,000 however, there was no cost incurred by Milan Community Schools thanks to grant funding obtained from the Rising Sun Regional Foundation and the Chester and Ruth Baylor Family Foundation.  Jane Rogers, Milan Schools Superintendent commented, “We so appreciate the Rising Sun Regional Foundation and the Chester and Ruth Baylor Family Foundation for their generosity in making this upgrade in our school security possible.  Without their support, we would have had to phase in the lock upgrade project over a period of two and possibly three years.”The first student day at Milan Community Schools is Thursday, August 8.last_img read more

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UPDATE: CAUGHT -Jennings County Sheriff’s Department need help in man hunt

first_imgOriginal Story: The Jennings County Sheriff’s Office is currently attempting to locate James Helton for the crime of intimidation with a weapon and pointing a firearm. The incident occurred on Wednesday in the Hayden, Indiana area and where Helton pointed a firearm at an individual and made threats.Prior to deputies’ arrival to the incident in Hayden, Helton left the area and went to his home in Jackson County which is located on county line road with Jennings County. Deputies arrived at Helton’s residence and allege to have observed the same vehicle in the driveway as at the scene of the incident in Hayden.Deputies attempted to make contact with Helton but could not get a response. After several attempts to call Helton out and without a response, members of the Jennings County SRT set up a perimeter around the residence.A search warrant was obtained to search for Helton inside of his residence, which was a large pull behind camper. The Indiana State Police were contacted to execute the search warrant. After several attempts to call Helton out, the State Police SWAT team made entry into the camper. Helton was not located inside the trailer.Sheriff Kenny Freeman encourages anyone with information on the whereabouts of James Helton to contact the Jennings County Sheriff’s Office at 812-346-5111 or the anonymous tip line at 812-346-0342. Hayden, IN—UPDATE: James Helton was taken into custody at approximately 3:00 AM Saturday, at a residence in Seymour.Seymour Police received information that Helton might be inside of the residence. After confirming that Helton was inside the residence a perimeter was set up and the Seymour Police Department SWAT was called.SWAT was on scene for several hours attempting to call Helton out of the residence. Helton eventually came out of the residence, without incident, and was taken into custody. Helton was transported to the Jennings County Jail where he is currently being held on the Jennings County arrest warrant.last_img read more

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Inter hint at Torres interest

first_imgChelsea striker Fernando Torres is a target of Inter Milan, according to the Serie A club’s general director Marco Fassone. The Spain international has been strongly linked with a move away from Stamford Bridge this summer despite having two years left on his contract with the London club. Inter are looking to strengthen their attacking line this summer and the 30-year-old is among the players the Nerazzurri are considering. Press Associationcenter_img “Will we sign Torres?” Fassone said on www.inter.it. “You all know that some names have circulated (in the media) and even (club) president (Erick) Thohir has not made a mystery of the fact that they interest us. “Who will be the right candidate in the end has yet to be defined.” Inter’s transfer market this summer will depend on whether the club qualify for Europe next season. The Nerazzurri, who missed out on Europe this term, are fifth in the standings and currently hold the last Europa League qualifying spot with five games to go in Serie A. “It’s obvious that in the last few months, our club president has requested as an aim to return to Europe,” Fassone said. “It would be problematic not to qualify for continental competition for a second straight year, not just for the work we are doing but also from a financial standpoint.” last_img read more

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