Carr’s biscuit factory to build ‘cracker packers’ statue

first_imgPladis-owned Carr’s Biscuits will create a statue to commemorate its “cracker packers” [women workers of the factory] over the last generation near to its factory in Carlisle.The bronze sculpture, which is set to cost around £70,000 and will stand at 5ft 4ins, will portray two women working at the famous Caldewgate factory and will be built next to Paddy’s Market car park.Hazel Reeves, a Sussex-based artist, has been commissioned to design the statue, which is due to be unveiled on International Women’s Day next year (8 March 2018).The majority of the funding will come from major retailer Sainsbury’s as part of the development of its Caldewgate superstore, with the McVitie’s parent company, Pladis, also contributing. Hunter Davies, who wrote the book The Biscuit Girls, which tells the lives of women at the factory, will also contribute £5,000 to the cost.Mike Heaney, factory general manager, said the company was proud that its factory was part of the fabric of the community.“This commission reflects and celebrates a key element of Carlisle’s distinctive social and industrial history,” Heaney said.“This public art work will help honour those who have helped shape our town’s history, and we can’t wait for the unveiling next year.”The factory produces 80,000 tonnes of biscuits a year and employs around 600 people.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s SGA president reflects on semester of community-building during time of administrative transition

first_imgLooking aheadStepping into the spring semester, Nelson said she and Allen hope to complete several projects that have been in the works since the start of the academic year, including the reinvigoration of Dalloway’s Coffeehouse.“I would love to see Dalloway’s become something by the end of our term,” Nelson said. “And that’s something that I think is really important because I think that it helps with so many of these things that we talk so much about when we talk about community, … when we talk about keeping girls on campus because it’s safer. How are we fostering that? We can’t just expect them to hang out in the McCandless first floor lounge, right? So I’d love to see that happen. I think that we have a really good chance of seeing that happen.”Additionally, Nelson said SGA hopes to continue promoting community through other channels, including a preview day for first-year students from underrepresented groups.“I’ve worked … on the past preview days, but I’d really love to see one just for our minority students, and even talk about what that looks like in terms of recruiting diversely, but also retaining our diverse students. Equity is a huge problem on this campus that I don’t yet know how to address,” she said. “We’ve had lots of great conversations about that. I’d love to see progress in terms of equity.” Student Government Association has made improvements in several areas of student life, largely due to the hard work and creative thinking from its committees. Nelson and Allen have pushed to address the core value of community on campus, and the high event attendance shows that these efforts have been largely successful. When faced with criticism for decisions made within SGA, Nelson and Allen could benefit from heightened transparency and more direct communication with the students. In the upcoming semester, the pair should have a greater presence on campus, either by attending committee events or taking leadership of future initiatives.Grade: B+ Tags: Nelson-Allen, Student Government Association, Student Government Insider 2019 When seniors Terra Nelson and Olivia Allen stepped into their respective roles as Saint Mary’s Student Government Association (SGA) president and vice president for the 2019-2020 academic year, they brought a lot of big ideas to the table. They campaigned on a platform that included installing printers in every dorm, opening Regina parking lot to students, expanded Munch Money use and a weekly organized “This Week at Saint Mary’s” email.Though administrators encouraged Nelson and Allen to continue thinking of innovative solutions for student issues, they also offered them a healthy dose of perspective, Nelson said.“I think in the beginning, it can be a little bit discouraging when you’re working with [the administration], and they’re saying, like, ‘Hey, great idea, but it’s not going to work out,’” she said. “There are really good reasons that you can’t do those things. I think from our perspective, we come in, and we’re like, ‘Well, how hard can it be?’ There are so many things that you need to consider. They have been so helpful and given us room to dream big, and also reining it in and … calling our attention to things that we might not see. I’m really thankful, always grateful for that added feedback and mentorship.”Moving forward with the platform proved to be more difficult than expected, Nelson said, with unexpected layers of bureaucracy and precedents making it challenging to enact more far-reaching goals. Despite these hurdles, Nelson said she and Allen are extremely pleased with the accomplishments they’ve made thus far and look forward to continued momentum going into the spring semester.“The one thing I didn’t realize before we stepped into office was how many pieces of the puzzle there are when you have so many committees and so many people to report back to,” Nelson said. “That’s just a lot to manage and then execute. But all in all, I think this semester has gone really well. There are a lot of things that I’m proud of, [and] a lot of things that I think, ‘Man, I hope that we can get that done next semester.’”Much of this success is owed to the SGA committee members who have worked diligently to carry out the platform ideas introduced by the executives, Nelson said. The Community Committee has been especially active this semester, she said, making improvements to first-year orientation and advancing plans to reinstall Clarissa Dalloway’s Coffeehouse as a student-space on campus.“When we started this year, just kind of looking over first-year orientation, we wanted to make it more community-oriented, and we wanted to make it more fun,” Nelson said. “We had community events for the first years, and it was just so awesome to see them gather in McCandless on that first night of school, hang out and eat cookies together.”Improvements were also made to pre-Domerfest activities, Nelson said, resulting in resounding approval from both first-years and those who have witnessed previous years of programming.“Everyone said, ‘It’s the best that we’ve seen it,’ which was the goal,” she said. “We want people to look back on that first week and say, ‘Wow, there’s a lot of good that was done.’”The first event in Dalloway’s, free post-game snacks for Saint Mary’s students returning from the Nov. 23 Notre Dame vs. Boston College football game, as well as other on-campus activities were well-attended and received, Nelson said. This level of turnout is an essential part of the Nelson-Allen platform which ran on the core value of “community,” she said.“The turnout for everything has been really, really strong, and that’s not something that I’ve ever seen,” Nelson said. “I’m proud of that.”The Mission Committee has also contributed to community building on campus, both by scheduling rotating masses followed by snacks in McCandless, Regina and Le Mans, and by posting a list of different locations to practice non-Catholic faiths, Nelson said.center_img Making decisions in a time of transitionSimilar to former SGA president Madeline Corcoran and vice president Kathy Ogden, whose term coincided with the resignation of former College President Jan Cervelli, Nelson and Allen are experiencing some shifts within the administration.The Presidential Search Committee has spent the past weeks narrowing down a field of potential candidates to fill the office of Interim President Nancy Nekvasil, who will vacate the position in 2020. Additionally, vice president for student affairs Karen Johnson announced in November that she will be retiring at the culmination of this semester.“It’s difficult when there is so much transition within the College to really push some of these big things,” Nelson said. “It doesn’t hinder us, but it makes the conversations different because we don’t know who’s taking over next year, next semester, in terms of our vice president of student affairs, and that’s big.”Despite changes in leadership, Nelson said she feels confident about the way SGA has performed this past semester and hopes Saint Mary’s students are noticing.“I think that SGA this year is in a really healthy place,” she said. “I hope that the student body sees that.”Though SGA has found success in many areas, they faced some backlash from students after announcing they would be collaborating with Residence Hall Association (RHA) to plan the annual Navy Ball instead of hosting a fall formal.“For me, I feel like a lot of times [students] just see the really negative side,” she said. “A great example of this was when we planned the Navy Ball, and that was because formal was off the table. So we made Navy Ball different, and we tried so hard to revamp it, and honestly, it was a phenomenal turnout. I was shocked. In terms of safety, I couldn’t have been more pleased, but … it’s hard for me to see all the positive when you get that one really angry email.”If there is any negative feedback, Nelson said, it could be the result of a disconnect between the student body and the members of SGA, who experience different perspectives of the work the group does on campus.“I know that SGA is in a healthy place, and I think that we’re working really hard, but again, from the outside looking in, you never know,” she said. “That’s something that I am not quite sure how we can fully address. I think that transparency is really important, but it’s also really important to just be professional.”SGA will continue to be intentional in addressing each student concern they receive, Nelson said.“I feel that there’s definitely work to be done,” Nelson said. “I think we’re in a very healthy spot. I know that we can improve. I’m curious to see what that looks like, and I’d love student feedback on that as well.”last_img read more

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All eyes on Trafford

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Wärtsilä to build bioLNG facility in Asker

first_imgImage courtesy of WärtsiläFinnish technology group Wärtsilä has been given the notice to proceed for a liquid biogas (bioLNG) plant to be built in Asker, Norway.The contract for the plant was awarded in April 2018 by VEAS, a Norwegian wastewater treatment and biogas producing company, and the notice to proceed was signed in December 2018, Wärtsilä said in its statement.The new facility will comprise a biogas upgrading and liquefaction plant. It will enable VEAS to produce biogas creating an alternative to fossil fuels and reducing CO2 emissions.The new bioLNG plant will be incorporated together with the company’s existing biogas plant. The total bioLNG production capacity will be 20 tons per day.The scope of supply for the bioLNG plant includes upgrading of the biogas, hot water production, liquefaction, storage and truck loading capability.Wärtsilä is delivering the system on a fast-track basis, and the on-site installation is scheduled to be completed within a 14-month time-frame. The plant is expected to become in commercial operation during 2020.last_img read more

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Gillette razors are being recalled

first_imgNationwide—Gillette is recalling nearly 90,000 women’s razors.The company issued the recall Thursday for 4-packs of Venus Simply3 Disposable Razors and Daisy 12 + 1 Venus Simply3 Bonus Packs, because of misaligned razors. Gillette says these pose a higher risk of cuts during normal use.Gillette says if you own either of these products you stop using it and contact the company to receive a postage-paid return label to send the razors back, and you’ll receive a voucher for a free replacement.So far, the company has only received one report of a consumer being cut while using a recalled razor.last_img read more

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Hull deny Long deal in place

first_img Long was close to signing for the Tigers on transfer deadline day in September, arriving at the club’s training ground via private jet from Dublin after an offer was accepted by the Baggies. But the Midlands club pulled the plug when they failed to secure a deal for Chelsea’s Romelu Lukaku, who instead opted for a loan at Everton. Hull boss Steve Bruce has not hidden his ongoing interest in the Republic of Ireland forward but reports that an agreement had been reached and a medical was due on Thursday appear wide of the mark. An official statement read: “Contrary to reports in the media this morning, the club confirms that it has not reached any agreement with West Bromwich Albion over the transfer of striker Shane Long, and as such will not be conducting a medical with the player today.” Hull have denied reaching agreement with West Brom on a deal for striker Shane Long.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Guyana remains drug trafficking transit point

first_imgLong road ahead in fighting drug scourge– US State Dept reportA key report on the global fight against narcotic trafficking and money laundering has been released by the United States Department of State. Entitled theSome 1276lbs of marijuana, which were part of a drug bust at John Fernandes Wharf in 2016“International Narcotics Control Strategy Report (INCSR)”, it shows that Guyana has a long road ahead in combating the drug scourge.According to the report, which was released recently, Guyana is still a transit point for cocaine destined for the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and West Africa. The report also mapped out the route for cocaine coming from Colombia, noting that it was smuggled to Venezuela, thence to Guyana via sea or air.“Smugglers also transit land borders with Brazil, Venezuela, and Suriname. Cocaine is often concealed in legitimate commodities and smuggled via commercial maritime vessels, air transport, human couriers, “go-fast” boats or various postal methods,” the report added.In a domestic context, the report states that “the influence of narcotics trafficking is evident in the country’s criminal justice systems and other sectors”. Traffickers, it noted, “are attracted by the country’s poorly monitored ports, remote airstrips, intricate river networks, porous land borders, and weak security sector capacity”.In an analysis on Trinidad and Tobago, the report states that the islands’ production of marijuana is concentrated in the heavily forested mountains. However, it was observed that marijuana cultivators in the twin-island republic compete with imports from other countries, including Guyana.Drug enforcementGuyana, the report noted, has a drug enforcement presence at its international airports, post offices, and, to a lesser extent, at port and land-border entry points. It acknowledged the five major agencies involved in the anti-drug fight: the Guyana Police Force (GPF); Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA); the Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU); the Special Organised Crimes Unit (SOCU), and the Guyana Defence Force (GDF).“The GDF supports law enforcement agencies with boats, aircraft, and personnel, but has limited capacity and lacks law enforcement authority. The Guyana Coast Guard (GCG), a GDF sub-component and US partner in maritime interdiction, patrols Guyana’s territorial waters and conducts humanitarian search-and-rescue missions.”In 2012, with US funding through the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI), the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Container Control Programme (CCP) established “a multi-agency CCP Port Control Unit at the John Fernandes Wharf, Guyana’s most active port”.The report acknowledges some success that initiative had, such as the April 2016 seizure of 48 kilograms (kg) of cocaine and in June, 579 kg of marijuana.“Through the first six months of 2016, the GPF reported seizing 16 kg of cocaine, a significant decrease from the 134.2 kg of cocaine that was seized over the same period in 2015. CANU reported seizing 60 kg of cocaine over this period (down from 568.3 kg in 2015), and the GRA did not report any seizures. Guyanese authorities convicted 46 persons on drug-related charges during 2016,” the report said.Drug rehabilitationBut the report paints a bleak picture of the Government’s commitment to drug rehabilitation schemes. It states that Guyana lacks a comprehensive strategy to reduce demand and adequately address drug rehabilitation.It notes that marijuana is the most widely used drug in Guyana, followed by cocaine. But the report observes that there is only one Government body responsible for drug rehabilitation.“The Guyana National Council for Drug Education, Rehabilitation, and Treatment, within the Ministry of Public Health, is the single Government body responsible for addressing demand reduction. Non-governmental organisations also offer rehabilitation services.”The report acknowledged that the University of Guyana (UG) had initiated a demand reduction curriculum through funding from the Organisation of American States/Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS/CICAD).Other means of rehabilitation, the report noted, was the Skills and Knowledge for Youth Employment (SKYE) project, which the US supports as part of the CBSI.“This provides vulnerable youth with training, mentorship, job placement and other support to increase their chances of success and to reduce youth involvement in crime and violence. The programme also supports increased use of alternative sentences, so that youth who commit minor crimes are given an opportunity to rehabilitate outside penal facilities,” the report stated.However, the report emphasises that the US is welcome to increasing its cooperation with the Government of Guyana “to advance mutual interests against the threat of international drug trafficking”.Noting that Guyana has shown an interest in furthering collaboration under the CBSI, the report said the US was looking forward to more progress on investigations, prosecutions, extraditions and security sector capacity enhancement.In addition, the report spoke of the US Government’s expectation that Guyana would continue engagement with at-risk communities, as well as enforcement of laws against money laundering and financial crimes.last_img read more

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Amino Acids Found in Cretaceous Amber

first_imgIf this doesn’t take the cake for soft tissue preservation: intact amino acids in amber said to be 100 million years old!Even this one evoked a ‘wow’ response from Jon Tennant at the PLoS Paleontology Community blog. On April 23, McCoy et al in Nature Scientific Reports announced “Ancient amino acids from fossil feathers in amber.” Tennant writes,Then [sic, the] fossil record some times [sic] is one of those things which just stops you dead in your tracks, with ‘wow’ written all over your face. Today, one of those moments just happened. Researchers have now discovered fossilised amino acids, entombed for more than 100 million years in amber.Now, this is not the first time such things have been discovered. Typically, when proteins have been found fossilised it has been within bones from large, terrestrial vertebrates. This is the first time they have been discovered within amber, within a smaller organism.The bones of large vertebrates he mentions undoubtedly refer to the T. rex found by Mary Schweitzer in 2005, and subsequent finds of dinosaur soft tissue (see Bob Enyart’s growing list). “Critically, amber allows the exceptional preservation of the organic soft tissues, right down to the microscopic scale,” Tennant says. “This includes amino acids.” Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins.The Racemization ClockBecause life uses only left-handed amino acids, any fossil that preserves left-handed forms is assumed to be recent. Proteins switch from all left-handed to a mixture of left- and right-handed amino acids, a process called racemization. A fossil with a mixture of left- and right-handed amino acids, therefore, is assumed to be ancient. The paper’s Abstract explains,Ancient protein analysis is a rapidly developing field of research. Proteins ranging in age from the Quaternary to Jurassic are being used to answer questions about phylogeny, evolution, and extinction. However, these analyses are sometimes contentious, and focus primarily on large vertebrates in sedimentary fossilisation environments; there are few studies of protein preservation in fossils in amber. Here we show exceptionally slow racemisation rates during thermal degradation experiments of resin enclosed feathers, relative to previous thermal degradation experiments of ostrich eggshell, coral skeleton, and limpet shell. We also recover amino acids from two specimens of fossil feathers in amber. The amino acid compositions are broadly similar to those of degraded feathers, but concentrations are very low, suggesting that much of the original protein has been degraded and lost. High levels of racemisation in more apolar, slowly racemising amino acids suggest that some of the amino acids were ancient and therefore original. Our findings indicate that the unique fossilisation environment inside amber shows potential for the recovery of ancient amino acids and proteins.The rate of racemization is poorly known. The scientists ran some experiments encasing modern proteins in resin for 504 hours (3 weeks) at high temperature (170 C) and found very low rates of racemization. 100 million years, however, is a very long time – some nine orders of magnitude longer. Could amino acids survive at all for such a long time? Even allowing for different environmental conditions, histories, and chemical compositions of amber, preservation at all seems unreasonable. Proteins can be degraded by diffusion, cosmic rays and other variables in addition to amino-acid racemization, especially outdoors. Protected lab conditions may not represent the true decay rate.Amber CentipedeAnother remarkable amber specimen was reported by Science Daily: “Dwarfs under dinosaur legs: 99-million-year-old millipede discovered in Burmese amber.” No preserved proteins or amino acids are reported in the press release. This millipede is also dated back into the Cretaceous. As usual, the scientists’ focus is on evolution:To analyse the species and confirm its novelty, the scientists used 3D X-ray microscopy to ‘slice’ through the Cretaceous specimen and look into tiny details of its anatomy, which would normally not be preserved in fossils. The identification of the millipede also presents the first clue about the age of the order Callipodida, suggesting that this millipede group evolved at least some 100 million years ago. A 3D model of the animal is also available in the research article.The discovery was published in the journal ZooKeys. It contains an evolutionary conundrum stuffed into Darwinism against expectations:While the callipodidan habitus seems to have remained generally unchanged for at least 99 million years, pleurotergal and hypoproctal setation, as well as the complexity of eyes in ground-dwelling forms may have evolved recently in the order.The Moyboy Paradigm TrapScientists believing in millions of years and billions of years (moyboy) cannot extricate themselves from their assumptions. Notice the circular reasoning in the paper about feather amino acids:Significant contamination, however, is unlikely due to the strong feather signal in the amino acid composition. Moreover, other researchers have found that keratin proteins preserve even into the Jurassic, suggesting that Cretaceous keratin preservation is not at all unexpected or unreasonable.They refer back to seven papers by Mary Schweitzer, the best-known discoverer of dinosaur soft tissue. These scientists’ reasoning is, ‘If Schweitzer says Jurassic soft tissue can survive 100 million years or more, then we aren’t surprised to find amino acids in our sample.’ Nobody seems to have the courage to step out of the moyboy paradigm and think for themselves. Are such long ages reasonable?In his ‘wow’ moment, did Jon Tennant think to question his assumptions? Did he think outside the box for a moment to question whether amino acids could survive ten thousand years, let along 100 million years? Not at all. His worldview gravitated to the only thought in his head:As the authors state: “…identification of protein sequences from fossil feathers, combined with their morphological investigation, would allow important functional and evolutionary information to be determined over long timescales.”So this is a really cool step closer to understanding the physiology and evolution of dinosaurs and birds, that just a few years ago would have been virtually unthinkable!Conclusions are subservient to paradigms, which are subservient to worldviews. Brute facts, however, are what they are.Myths can be perpetuated in scientific papers by one group of authors simply trusting the assumptions of a previous author. And one of the foundational assumptions of the moyboy paradigm is that Darwin needed long ages to evolve people from bacteria ancestors. (Visited 720 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Global banks ‘ramping up in Africa’

first_img4 January 2012 The eurozone crisis may have cast a pall over global bankers’ New Year, but this hasn’t stopped a number of international institutions from increasing their presence in Africa – starting in South Africa – to take advantage of the continent’s fast growth rates, the Financial Times reports. The publication lists four major institutions that set up shop in South Africa in 2011, in a shift “driven by the stagnation of developed economies, coupled with the potential of a resource-rich, but under-developed continent with 1-billion people”. According to the Financial Times, in the course of 2011: JPMorgan began offering rand clearing services in South Africa, Credit Suisse set up a wholly owned subsidiary in the country, Barclays shifted its Africa headquarters from Dubai to Johannesburg, and China’s ICBC opened its first African representative office in Cape Town. BNP Paribas also moved to expand its local footprint through the acquisition of a majority stake in Cadiz Securities, the derivatives research and brokerage unit of South African financial services group Cadiz Holdings. ICBC said its Cape Town office would strengthen its strategic cooperation with South Africa’s Standard Bank, in which the Chinese bank acquired a 20% stake in 2008 for R36.7-billion – the biggest single Chinese investment in Africa to date. The Financial Times quotes John Coulter, JPMorgan’s senior country officer for sub-Saharan Africa, as saying: “Better governance and macroeconomic policies, together with greater political stability in a number of African countries, have contributed to a significant improvement in the overall economic performance of the continent. “As a consequence, Africa is being taken more seriously as an investment and business destination. “The opportunity we see in Africa is really to build out our commercial banking business to deliver treasury and corporate banking services to our clients across Africa, at the same time opening up the way for investment banking opportunities,” Coulter told the FT. “If we invest now, then we will reap the upturn in Africa, whether it’s in five years, 10 years or 20 years, but we recognise that we need to make that investment now.” Leo Reif, head of the investment banking department at Credit Suisse South Africa, told the FT: “The dialogue these days with clients is about emerging markets to an increasing extent and they talk about Asia and then they want to talk about Africa. “If you can’t talk about Africa, then they’ll find another bank.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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