Maintenance Technician

first_imgApply OnlineQUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: (To perform this jobsuccessfully, an individual must be able to perform each essentialduty satisfactorily. The requirements listed below arerepresentative of the knowledge, skill, and/or abilityrequired.) Requires a minimum education generally equivalent to anAssociate’s Degree from a related technical college program. It isdesirable for the employee to be certified in Forklift Operation(Train the Trainer), NIULPE Third Glass Power Engineering, State ofWisconsin Cross Connection Control Tester Registration.Requires a minimum of 3 to 12 months of similar maintenanceoperations experience.Requires excellent oral and written communication skills toeffectively communicate with employees, students, and facultymembers.Requires the ability to perform basic mathematical calculationssuch as addition, subtraction, division, andRequires the ability to use a personal computer and Webbrowser, helpdesk ticketing, and network troubleshootingsoftware.Requires the ability to use a variety of hand and power toolssuch as a hammer, screwdriver, and electricRequires knowledge of and the ability to use a variety ofstandard office equipment such as a telephone and computerkeyboard.PROTECTIVE CLOTHING REQUIRED:Requires the ability to wear safety glasses, hard hat, hearingprotection, and rubber gloves as needed.PHYSICAL DEMANDS: (The physical demands described here arerepresentatives of those that must be met by an employee tosuccessfully perform the essential functions of this job.Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals withdisabilities to perform the essential functions. The phrases“occasionally,” “regularly,” and “frequently” correspond to thefollowing definitions: “occasionally” means up to 1/3 of workingtime, “regularly” means between 1/3 and 2/3 of working time, and“frequently” means 2/3 and more of working time.)While performing the duties of this job, the employee is frequentlyrequired to stand, talk and/or hear, and/or use hands to finger,handle, or touch objects, tools, or controls. The employee mustregularly walk, kneel, stoop, crouch, or crawl. The employee isoccasionally required to reach above shoulders, taste and/or smell.The employee must frequently lift and/or move over 100 pounds tomove furniture between offices. Specific vision abilities requiredby this job include close vision, distance vision, color vision,peripheral vision, depth perception, and the ability to adjustfocus.WORK ENVIRONMENT: (The work environment characteristicsdescribed here are representative of those an employee encounterswhile performing the essential functions of this job. Reasonableaccommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilitiesto perform the essential functions.)Work is performed in an office environment in a variety of worklocations throughout the Carthage Campus. The employee isoccasionally working near moving mechanical parts, in highprecarious places, in wet/humid conditions, in outdoor conditions,with exposure to bodily fluids and contagious diseases, inproximity to fumes or airborne particles, and near the risk ofelectric shock. The noise level in the work environment varies fromquiet to loud, depending on tools/equipment used in campus worklocation (such as drilling and loud machinery).The above statements reflect the general details necessary todescribe the principle functions of the occupation described andshall not be construed as a detailed description of all the workrequirements that may be inherent in the occupation.Institutional InformationFounded in 1847, Carthage College combines an environment ofreflection and self-discovery with a culture of high expectation,so that our students uncover and ignite their true potential. As afour-year private liberal arts college with roots in the Lutherantradition, we place a strong emphasis on both moral andintellectual values. Our prime location in Kenosha, Wisconsin,midway between Chicago and Milwaukee, allows students theopportunity to learn in a professional context. Our beautifulcampus, an 80-acre arboretum on the shore of Lake Michigan is hometo 150 scholars, 2,600 full-time students, and 400 part-timestudents. Our rich academic experience equips students withfoundational knowledge and skills, preparing graduates to belifelong learners and to lead meaningful, productive lives.Carthage College is an equal opportunity employer (EOE)dedicated to the goal of building a culturally diverse community.We welcome applications from a broad spectrum of people, includingmembers of ethnic minorities, women, veterans, and individuals withdisabilities. All qualified applicants will receive considerationfor employment without regard to race, color, religion,sex,gender expression, gender identity, sexualorientation,national origin, protected veteran status or statusas an individual with a disability. This position is responsible for maintaining day-to-day plumbingand fire protection services for the College campusbuildings.DESCRIPTION OF ESSENTIAL DUTIES:Maintain and support all campus plumbing fixtures, drainage,and water supply.Maintain and support all fire sprinkler systems, fireextinguishers, and fire hood systems.Maintain and support all snow removal operations as needed forcampus.Responsible for Chapel set-up operations and furniture movingas needed.Complete other duties as assigned.last_img read more

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Improving Health Care for Children with Special Needs

first_imgHealth care delivered close to home is vitally important, especially when the patient is a child. But how do community pediatric practices adapt to offer the best care when faced with a child who has complex and often, multiple health needs? Reporting in this month’s issue of Pediatrics, Dartmouth researchers outline a process designed to help any practice become a state of the art “medical home” for such children.Assessing the effectiveness of a model program they developed, Dartmouth Medical School researchers Dr. W. Carl Cooley, adjunct associate professor in pediatrics, and Jeanne McAllister, research associate in pediatrics, review the experience of four practices in Vermont and New Hampshire who used their program to identify and implement changes to improve the care they deliver to children with special health care needs.The concept of community-based “medical homes” – places where care is managed through coordination of clinicians, educators, therapists, healthcare professionals, and caregivers – has been advocated by national health policy makers and the American Academy of Pediatrics as the best model for providing systematic yet individualized care to children with complex conditions and multiple needs.Still, the changes required for a practice to become an effective medical home can be difficult to make. “Introducing change into a busy pediatric practice is like trying to repair a bicycle while riding it,” the authors write. “Even the most motivated practice finds change difficult to implement. Many primary care providers believe that implementing the medical home concept is the right thing to do but question how they can do so and remain solvent.”To make the process easier, the authors developed a medical home improvement tool kit that allows practices to look at key functions of the medical home, assess their own operation, and identify the steps and strategies they will follow to become a medical home.The four participating practices all focused on improving different aspects of their medical home environment. In New Hampshire, Exeter Pediatrics Associates of Exeter, developed pre- and post-visit surveys to elicit parents’ chief concerns and then assessed whether or not these concerns were addressed in the visit. Dartmouth Hitchcock-Plymouth Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine of Plymouth created an educational series for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder that resulted in new partnerships with parents and schools. In Vermont, Upper Valley Pediatrics of Bradford began to schedule “chronic condition management” visits to provide regular, proactive care rather than only responding to problems after they arose. Gifford Pediatrics of Randolph held a series of community forums aimed at facilitating the exchange of information between families and schools about children with acute care needs. Each project has spurred new improvement projects in related areas.Each of the participating practices also introduced the role of a practice-based care coordinator and discovered the value of systematic consumer input to the design and operation of the medical home.The success of the model program in these practices and in practices across the country is encouraging on a number of fronts, according to the authors, who direct The Center for Medical Home Improvement within the Hood Center for Children at the Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. (www.medicalhomeimprovement.org(link is external)) Establishing medical homes improves access to care, potentially makes more treatments available to children, strengthens the relationship between families and caregivers, and ultimately provides the child with more comprehensive and effective care.This has significant implications for the health care system nationally, suggest the authors, who note that while children with special health care needs make up only 20 percent of children, they currently account for 80 percent of pediatric health expenses.The next step for the authors is to investigate the relationship between medical homes and outcomes for children with special needs. They are interested in whether effective medical homes lead to decreased utilization of the health care system, increased patient and family satisfaction, and better health outcomes.last_img read more

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Fans urge Roger Federer to watch Slumdog Millionaire after he asks for Bollywood movie…

first_imgAdvertisement zs1y9NBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsqde7Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ewdtx3p( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) fsw9gWould you ever consider trying this?😱8wuhCan your students do this? 🌚4dnhRoller skating! Powered by Firework Roger Federer , perhaps the most beloved athlete and sportsman in the world took to twitter to ask for movie recommendations. What did he expect? That it’ll solve his movie selection dillema? Instead , his wide fan following recommended a wide variety of films. Such a variety that we’re pretty sure Roger ended up watching nothing.Advertisement It began with this tweet :Advertisement Ofcourse, the thread would never be complete without a mention of Fedal bromance!This is where the thread blew up :We hope Federer took this advice. Slumdog Millionaire is an iconic film of dual nature – Foreign direction and Indian casting.  Advertisementlast_img read more

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Park places

first_imgThe fishing-pier project, which will cost a total of $876,000, will be accessible to the disabled.“The pathway will have a correct slope for someone in a wheelchair,” said Mika Yamamoto, unincorporated-area liaison for the county Parks and Recreation Department. “If you’re in a wheelchair or using a cane, getting down to a lake to fish can be a challenge.”The pier will be located on the southeast side of what is called South Legg Lake, Yamamoto said. Access will be from Durfee Avenue.Construction is expected to begin in early October and be completed in the spring.The $100,000 La Mirada grant will pay for a spa that can hold up to 21 people, said Lori Thompson, city aquatics manager. The spa will be part of Splash! — the city’s new Aquatic Center that will include three pools.“(The spa) will be great for therapy for seniors,” Thompson said. “Hot water is great for circulation and relaxing muscles.”Water also is safer for low-impact exercises for seniors who might have arthritis, she said.Splash! is expected to be open by late October with an official ribbon cutting in early November, Thompson said.In La Habra Heights, the $100,000 grant will help clean up La Mirada Creek that flows through the city, mostly parallel to Hacienda Road, into La Habra.The money will help pay to remove concrete that was put into the creek after the city’s gymnasium was refurbished during the 1980s and to remove bamboo that has been choking the stream, said Ron Bates, city manager.“I see a more free-flowing and improved creek,” Bates [email protected](562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Leftover money from two state and two county parks bonds will help pay for a new fishing pier, a therapy spa in La Mirada, exhibits along Whittier’s Greenway Trail and a cleanup of La Mirada Creek in La Habra Heights. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday awarded a $485,000 contract to Faris Construction to build a fishing pier at Legg Lake and approved the allocation of grants for the other three projects.The grants were from $1.8 million that Supervisor Don Knabe awarded to 17 cities and two county departments. The three Whittier-area cities each received $100,000 — the maximum amount given.“These projects are about making a reinvestment in our communities,” Knabe said. “These improvements will not only increase the quality of life for those who reside in the cities, but also the residents of the surrounding communities that utilize these areas.”last_img read more

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Consider cost per bushel over cost per acre

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Corn and soybean growers should not scrimp on crop inputs because of lower grain prices and tightening profit margins, a Purdue University agricultural economist says.Michael Gunderson, associate professor and associate director for Purdue’s Center for Food and Agricultural Business, said cutting corners on inputs can be more costly for producers because of yield reductions.“The current commodity price climate might cause crop producers to focus more intensely than usual on managing costs of production,” Gunderson said. “Producers often budget on cost per acre. While this is an excellent start and certainly better than no budgeting at all, focusing only on total costs per acre might cause producers to overlook important productivity tradeoffs.“While it would be easy to lower total per-acre costs by simply reducing the amount of various inputs, doing so could reduce yields.”Instead, Gunderson said growers should consider budgeting based on outputs — or the production cost per bushel of grain — for three reasons:• Ease of evaluating decisions.• Per-unit fixed costs can decline with output increases.• There is a tradeoff between productivity and cost.“The most straightforward reason for calculating costs per bushel, rather than per acre, is that the crop being produced will be priced in dollars per bushel,” he said. “Having the costs and benefits in the same units makes comparison easy.”In addition, budgeting based on outputs takes the focus off cost per acre.“The result of budgeting based on the costs per unit of input, or dollars per acre, is that spending additional money on inputs always will appear to raise costs,” Gunderson said. “This type of analysis ignores the impact of inputs on the productivity of the operation. Some inputs increase yields more than others.“A grower budgeting based on cost per acre might forego the more expensive input simply because it costs more, while someone budgeting based on cost per unit of output might note that spending additional money per acre actually reduces total cost per acre because that input yields more bushels.”The drawback of this method is the same as with any: No budget can perfectly predict the future. Instead, Gunderson said, the key is to use history and trends to make predictions.Gunderson recently wrote an in-depth article about budgeting and pricing inputs, complete with tables and graphs, titled “Sometimes you have to spend money to make money.” It’s available on the Center for Food and Agricultural Business blog at http://agribusiness.purdue.edu/blog/spend-money-to-make-money.last_img read more

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DTN 2019 Digital Yield Tour – NE, SD

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Katie DehlingerDTN Farm Business EditorMOUNT JULIET, Tenn. (DTN) — Considering the wet spring that plagued Nebraska and South Dakota this year, corn and soybean yields are holding their own, but growers say average yields conceal a wide variation of crop conditions.The DTN/Progressive Farmer 2019 Digital Yield Tour, powered by Gro Intelligence, is an in-depth look at how this year’s corn and soybean crop is progressing using Gro’s real-time yield maps, which are generated with satellite imagery, rainfall data, temperature maps and other public data.On Tuesday, all of Gro’s estimates for corn and soybeans in South Dakota and Nebraska were lower than USDA’s yield estimates from Monday’s Crop Production report.Gro’s models for corn show a statewide average of 182 bushels per acre in Nebraska and 149 bpa in South Dakota. USDA pegged those states at 186 bpa and 157 bpa, respectively.Gro forecasts Nebraska soybean growers will harvest 56 bpa compared to USDA’s 58 bpa estimate, while South Dakota farmers will harvest 37 bpa compared to USDA’s 45 bpa estimate.You can see specific comparisons in these charts:Nebraska: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/…South Dakota: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/…Gro’s yield estimates on a county and state level update on a daily basis, so the numbers at publication time may be slightly different than what you find on the Gro website.DTN Senior Ag Meteorologist Bryce Anderson said the growing season in both states got off to a difficult start. In South Dakota, it was the ninth coldest season on record and the fourth wettest in 125 years of record keeping.“The state’s producers have been stymied by this calamitous start to the season. Estimates of corn prevented planted acreage show South Dakota with more than 2.8 million acres that were left unplanted because of the cold-and-wet pattern, and associated flooding,” he said.In Nebraska, the storms have lined up one after another, and all but the southwestern corner of the state has had above-normal, and in some cases significantly above-normal, precipitation. As a result, the crop is highly variable, with some areas benefiting from cool temperatures and ample moisture and others suffering from the same conditions.NEBRASKAGro Intelligence’s yield maps show average corn yields ranging from a low of 118 bpa in Grant County to a high of 211 bpa in Hamilton County. Those two counties have very different growing conditions, with Grant County located in the more arid western part of the state and Hamilton County in the land of center pivot irrigation. You can see the county level map of Nebraska here: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/….With a statewide average of 181 bpa, Nebraska has one of the highest average yields of the 10 states included in DTN’s Digital Yield Tour, and it’s only 11 bpa shy of last year’s bin-busting 192 bpa.Gro’s yield estimates incorporate another set of maps, known as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which use satellite imagery to show how abnormally dry or lush an area is, using a 10-year average “greenness” index. Those maps show areas that suffered from the excessively wet spring, but much of the damage tracks along the Platte River and Missouri River valleys.You can find that map here: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/….“It’s impressive how the eastern one-third of the state has a vegetation index that is either average to below, with many indications of prevented planting,” Anderson said. “In southern Nebraska, it appears that we are seeing the impact of extremely heavy rain in July that caused extensive flooding. Central Nebraska shows the effect of a lot of rain in midsummer, with the NDVI value indicating above-normal vegetation conditions.”Randy Uhrmacher farms in Adams and Webster counties in south-central Nebraska, where Gro forecasts corn yields of 199 bpa and 165 bpa, respectively.“Those seem about right considering the storm damage,” he said, adding that Adams County is primarily irrigated ground while Webster is mostly dryland. There are also more drowned-out spots and areas of poor germination in Webster County this year.Uhrmacher said this spring’s storms were spotty, and it seemed like he always had a dry field somewhere to plant, so while he wrapped up corn planting in late April and soybean planting in mid-May, there were farmers that planted up until around June 10.Gro pegs the average Nebraska soybean yield at 56 bpa, 3 bushels below NASS’ final estimate last year. Yields range from a low of 39 bpa in Hooker County to a high of 69 bpa in Phelps County.Uhrmacher said the early planted soybeans are podded well, and he’s happy with how they look. He hopes that some of his irrigated soybeans will yield 80 bpa.But he adds that late-planted soybeans are struggling.“There are probably more train wrecks out there than normal,” he said. “The good stuff is there, but it didn’t take much to mess it up.”SOUTH DAKOTAGro Intelligence forecasts South Dakota corn yields will be lower than last year at 149 bpa. Gro’s final yield estimate for South Dakota last year, at 153 bpa, was lower than USDA’s, at 160 bpa.Like Nebraska, the range of county yields is wide, but that also reflects different soils and growing conditions in the state. The highest corn yield estimate is 172 bpa in Union County in the state’s far southeastern corner while the lowest estimate is 59 bpa in Shannon County in the state’s southwest. You can view county level yields here: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/….South Dakota led the country in prevented planting acreage this year with a total of 3.86 million acres, 2.8 million of which were corn and 850,000 of which were soybeans. Those acres show up strongly in GRO’s NDVI map, with a heavy concentration in the southeastern corner of the state.Tregg Cronin, who farms in Potter County, said fall crops in his region look outstanding given the tough start to the growing season. He disputes Gro’s forecast of 101 bpa for his county, adding that he thinks 90% of the fields will yield more than that.His farm usually stretches corn planting over a comparatively wide window. So his earliest-planted corn went in 10 days to two weeks behind normal, while his latest-planted corn was only five to six days late.They decided to stop planting corn on May 31. They still had soybean and sunflower seeding left to complete, and chose to only have two late-planted crops rather than three.“Believe it or not, our earliest corn is not light years ahead,” he said. Soil temperatures were on the lower side and the corn took a while longer to germinate than later-planted corn. Then July temperatures were lower than average, and without a hot-and-dry spell to slow it down, the corn grew quickly.On Tuesday, Gro’s models estimate South Dakota’s average soybean yield at 40 bpa, down from last year’s 45 bpa. Todd County has the highest average yield at 51 bpa while Pennington has the lowest at 25 bpa.As with corn, Cronin thinks Gro’s models underestimated yield potential by pegging Potter County yields at 34 bpa. He said the beans are bigger and bushier than normal, and he thinks 50 bpa is achievable. And because of the cool, wet weather, they’re considering applying fungicide. “We just don’t normally get enough moisture to have concerns,” he said.On Wednesday, the digital “tour” will turn its focus to Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin. If you’d like your yield observations to be included in future stories, email DTN using the contact information below.ABOUT THE TOURThe DTN/Progressive Farmer 2019 Digital Yield Tour, powered by Gro Intelligence, takes place Aug. 13-16 and provides an in-depth look at how the year’s corn and soybean crops are progressing. Each day, we’ll feature crop condition and yield information from various states, which include links to the Gro yield prediction maps for those states. Yield summaries are viewable at the county level.The “tour” starts in the west, with the first day’s articles focusing on Kansas and Missouri and Nebraska and South Dakota. On Aug. 14, the tour will explore yield estimates from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. On Aug. 15, we will move into the Eastern Corn Belt — Illinois, Indiana and Ohio — before publishing a final look at Gro’s overall national yield predictions for the 2019 corn and soybean crops on Aug. 16. Readers should note that the Gro yield visuals are continually updated, while the DTN feature articles are based on the company’s yield estimate at the time the article was written. Numbers quoted in the articles may be different than those on the Gro website depending on when viewed.To see all the tour articles and related DTN stories about the 2019 crop, visit our tour site at: https://spotlights.dtnpf.com/….About Gro Intelligence: The New York-based company is focused on creating data analytics for the agriculture industry. Gro builds proprietary crop models that use satellite imagery, soil conditions, weather and other crop and environmental data to produce crop health and yield prediction numbers and visuals.To learn more about Gro, go here: https://www.gro-intelligence.com/….To read the research white paper on their modeling system, go here and select to “Download the corn yield model paper”: https://gro-intelligence.com/….Katie Dehlinger can be reached at [email protected] her on Twitter @KatieD_DTN(AG/ES)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Creative Zeitgeist: 2019 Royalty Free Music Trends Playlist

first_imgFor every visual design trend, there’s a royalty-free music trend to match. We combed our tracks to find the rising sounds that are shaping 2019’s creative landscape.We’re halfway through 2019, which means it’s the perfect time to revisit the popular Creative Trends report from our friends at Shutterstock. The report is compiled by researching billions of image, video, and music searches and downloads from Shutterstock customers, and it’s a great way for content creators like yourself to identify what’s hot — and what’s about to be.To help you stay in tune with the creative zeitgeist, we compiled a playlist of royalty-free music genres that pair with popular design styles revealed in the Creative Trends report. Give your next video project an edge by using one of the tracks below. This is the sound of 2019.Grungy Pop: The Sound of Zine CultureImage via Andy Vinnikov.Zine culture is a fairly ’90s approach to visual art, and grungy pop is its audio equivalent. Both are defined by a raw, indie, lo-fi aesthetic, featuring noisy textures and rough edges.You’ll find contemporary acts like Imagine Dragons and 21 Pilots using elements of grungy pop to capture the vibes of the early Alternative Nation, an execution we hear echoed in flannel-flying royalty-free tracks like “We Go High” by Grace Mesa and “Shell Shock” by Gyom.Corporate Ambient: The Sound of Everyday FuturismImage via Andrush.Technological advancement is practically passé at this point. The future is here, and connecting instantly to the entire world is a given, whether you like it or not. The “for-better-or-for-worse” electronic connectivity that defines modern society also drives the plots of The Social Network, Gone Girl, and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo — each the work of filmmaker David Fincher.Our music team categorizes royalty-free tracks like “Ambitech” by Dr. Hollywood and “Indie Tech Documentary” by High Street Music as corporate ambient, but that’s only because “Fincher-esque” made our legal team nervous. Rich with low-key atmosphere, but with an urgency that prevents them from being too contemplative, these songs would sound at home in any recent David Fincher film that features a Trent Reznor/Atticus Ross soundtrack.J-Pop: The Sound of KawaiiImage via gst.In a year when both Pokemon and Godzilla saw big-screen success, Japan’s influence on global pop culture continues with Kawaii. If you’re not familiar with the term, just imagine Pikachu sharing a rainbow-striped cupcake with Hello Kitty while they both giggle. Now you get it.Kawaii is adorable. It’s charming, childlike, and over-the-top delightful. It’s a term that encompasses anything cute, from playful typography to colorful fashion to music like J-Pop, as evidenced in the royalty-free tracks “Sleepless in Shibuya” and “J Pop Chant”  by Harpo Marks.Videographers will find J-Pop tracks perfect for fun travel vlogs, unboxing clips, craft tutorials, or really anything that needs a boost in upbeat positivity. Rest assured, if you’ve been struggling to find a song to accompany the videos you’ve taken of your pets acting ridiculous, your day has finally arrived. Especially if you took the time to dress those pets up in little hats before filming.But wait, there’s more!Dive into the playlist below to catch up on 2019’s trendiest royalty-free tracks, all of them available and reusable with a $49 Standard License. In addition to the music styles above, you’ll hear trap percussion beds, modern R&B jams, ambient cinematic pieces, and even a few country/hop-hop hybrids. Bonus: We threw in a couple of those ASMR tracks that the internet loves so much. Trust us — you’ll know them when you hear them. Cover image via oksanka007.Header image via fashion print.Playlist header via Quietworld.Looking for more royalty-free music playlists for your projects? Check these out.Make Your Cuts Shine with Royalty-Free Transition MusicCreative Royalty-free Intro Music for Better Viewer EngagementFresh Tracks: Hear June’s Best New Royalty Free MusicRococo Romance: Give Your Video a Classical Cinematic SoundIn the Shadows: The Changing Nature of Horror Musiclast_img read more

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No update on missing man from crash landing off Grand Bahama

first_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #USmanstillmissingaftercrashlandinginocean Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, December 18, 2017 – Grand Bahama – There is no update on the search  for a 57 year old man said to have gone missing in waters about 8 miles off West End, Grand Bahama Island when a small plane he was on, crash landed around noon last Thursday.   A 60 year old woman was rescued from the water and eventually airlifted to the United States.The plane had come from the US, investigators surmised but it remained a mystery where the plane crashed landed exactly.   US Coast Guard, Police and Customs were a part of the search and rescue operation; not only is the man missing at last report, but so is the aircraft.#MagneticMediaNews#USmanstillmissingaftercrashlandinginocean Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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