RGIII Falling Out of Good Graces of Many Redskins

Want to learn how tough Robert Griffin III is? How he handles the next week, amid criticism and mounting calls for backup Kirk Cousins, will go a long way to determining that critical question for the Washington Redskins’ quarterback.In just two weeks, Griffin–the darling of D.C., if not the NFL after a thrilling rookie season–has learned how quickly fans can turn on you when you do not produce. Following a second straight sorry start to games, both losses, the message boards and sports talk shows in D.C. are flooded with calls for Griffin to sit down until healthy in place of his backup, Cousins.Comments like, “Cousins gives us the best chance to win,” and “Robert Griffin is not the same guy. . . yet. He’s not that guy.”The case against Griffin is tangible. The Redskins fell behind significantly in the season-opening loss to the Philadelphia Eagles and trailed the Green Bay Packers 24-0 in Sunday’s 38-20 loss on the road. In each case, Griffin looked timid in his throwing motion, favoring his surgically repaired knee that kept him sidelined all of the preseason.“If I’ve got to do a little bit more to clean up that sloppiness,” he said Sunday, “then I’ll do it. . . I don’t point the finger at anybody else. Whatever goes on on that field, I’m responsible for that.”He added: “I’m not afraid to sit here and say, ‘Put that on my shoulders,’ ” Griffin said. “I’ll take that. We didn’t start fast because of me.”What made Griffin RGIII was his ability to escape the pocket with his mobility and gain yards as a runner, making him a double threat that crossed up defenses last season. By design or by choice, Griffin hardly uses his legs as an asset, making him predictable and easier to defend. The results have been the Redskins falling behind to insurmountable deficits.Hence, many are left to wonder if Griffin truly is healthy enough to lead the team at this point. He can point to the second half numbers as proof of his effectiveness. But most of the respectable final number he posted came when the opponents went into the so-called prevent defense, backing off and allowing receivers to catch the ball in front of them.The consensus is that Griffin is not healthy enough to run and is scared to run because of his knee, and it has stifled the offense. To wit: he rushed 8 1/2 times a game last season. In the two games this year, he has run the ball just four times a game.In 2012, Griffin averaged 8½ rushes in games he started and finished. He has averaged four runs a game. And his absence as a running possibility minimizes the team’s offensive creativity.“I’m not just going to run just to show people that I’m back,” Griffin said Sunday. “I think that’s stupid.”It’s not viable that he is the same player when he passes 49 times as he did Sunday and 40 the opening week.For sure, not playing in the preseason has hurt; Griffin looks more rusty than anything else. But the health concerns are legitimate. His passing motion is muted–he does not step through the throwing motion to get the proper velocity on the ball.Still, the cries for Cousins are pointless; Griffin is the man and will be, barring injury. It’s just a matter of when he gets more confidence in his ability to run and plant on the knee as he passes that will determine when his legion of fans return en masse. read more

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Can The Minnesota Wild Recover From Their LateSeason Swoon

The NHL playoffs begin today, but the Minnesota Wild and their fan base probably wish it were still February. Back then, the Wild had the second-most points in the NHL, they’d scored the fourth-most goals in the NHL, goalie Devan Dubnyk was the clear favorite for the Vezina trophy (given to the league’s top goaltender), and they were generally considered to be among the favorites to emerge out of the perennially competitive Western Conference. But once the calendar flipped to March, Minnesota headed in a decidedly different direction.In their 16 games last month, the Wild earned just 10 out of a possible 32 points. Only three teams collected fewer points than the Wild during March — two of those being the New Jersey Devils and Colorado Avalanche, each of whom owns the worst record in its respective conference. Although the Wild partially righted the ship with four straight victories to close the regular season, Minnesotans still have to be wondering what the heck went wrong for the team down the stretch — and whether it means the Wild are headed for a second-consecutive first-round playoff exit.One of the biggest factors behind the Wild’s March struggles was that they stopped scoring. Before their horrid stretch of play, the Wild were averaging 3.3 goals per game, second only to the Penguins (who on Feb. 28 were scoring 3.5 goals per game for the season). By contrast, the Wild scored just 2.5 goals per game during March.Scoring downturns like that don’t happen without a good reason, and for the Wild that reason involves shooting the puck. Through February, the Wild were scoring on 11 percent of the shots they took. During March, they scored on just 7.7 percent of the shots they took. Shooting percentage tends to regress to the mean, and so fluctuations can be expected, but Minnesota’s shooting percentage tanked precipitously last month.The Wild also got poor production from their power play in March: In 48 opportunities, they scored just five goals (12.5 percent), tying them for the fifth-worst scoring rate in the league with the man advantage for the month. On Feb. 28, the Wild had the third-best power play in the NHL, scoring on 22.6 percent of their opportunities. By the end of March, they’d fallen all the way to 10th.Minnesota’s suddenly anemic attack wouldn’t be as big a deal if they were still getting dominant play between the pipes, but like the skaters in front of him, Dubnyk’s numbers also regressed badly last month. In 14 appearances during March, he gave up 36 goals on 325 shots, good for a save percentage of .889 and a goals against average of 2.94. That’s pretty awful: If a qualified goalie had produced those numbers for the entire 2016-17 season, he’d rank 60th in save percentage and 51st in goals against average out of 62 netminders. (For reference’s sake, Dubnyk had a save percentage of .931 and a goals against average of 2.05 entering March, numbers that ranked first and second in the league, respectively, among goalies who’d played in 20 or more games.)Not all of Minnesota’s goaltending woes can be blamed on Dubnyk; he hasn’t gotten much help from backup Darcy Kuemper. Among goalies with at least 10 games played, Kuemper’s .902 save percentage and 3.13 goals against average rank 55th and 58th in the league. In his three appearances this March, Kuemper has a .870 save percentage and a 3.50 goals against average. Even for a No. 2 goalie, these are not numbers that inspire confidence, and Dubnyk has been forced to play more games than he might have if the Wild had a decent backup.Before last season, Dubnyk had never started more than 42 games. This season will mark the second-consecutive season he’s played in more than 60 games. Goaltender fatigue is hard to prove or disprove, but anecdotally speaking, it seems it may have hit Dubnyk hard this March — and a tired goalie is the last thing any team wants heading into the postseason. Last year, the Wild were bounced by the Dallas Stars in the first round in six games, giving up 3.5 goals a game over the course of the series. If Dubnyk is unable to recover from his current streak of poor play, it could mean more of the same for Minnesota come playoff time.In truth, Minnesota’s hot early-season play was also probably a mirage, to some degree or another. The Wild’s stellar shooting (11.1) and save (.925) percentages through the end of February added up to a ludicrous PDO of 103.6, which was tracking to be the second-highest single-season mark since PDO was first recorded in 2008 (trailing only this year’s Washington Capitals). That wasn’t sustainable, and their March skid just reinforces the maxim that PDO is unstable. Last month, the Wild posted a 7.7 shooting percentage and an .882 save percentage, good for a PDO of 95.9. (This is a very, very bad PDO; for reference, the worst PDO in the NHL this year belongs to Colorado, at 96.6.) Minnesota’s puck luck has morphed into some serious puck misfortune.Despite their very bad stretch run, the Wild still managed to finish second overall in the West. But in the post-lockout NHL, no Stanley Cup-winning team has collected less than 53 percent of available points over their final 20 regular-season games. By contrast, the Wild went just 8-10-2 in their final 20 games, collecting just 45 percent of the possible points on the table.A couple good analogues for this year’s Wild team are the 2013-14 St. Louis Blues and the 2014-15 Nashville Predators, both of whom finished third in the Western Conference, but also suffered disastrous stretch runs much like the Wild had this season. In the playoffs, each was bounced in the first round by the Chicago Blackhawks in six games.Unlike those teams, the Wild won’t have to face Chicago in the first round. (They play St. Louis starting on Wednesday.) But if the fates of those Blues and Predators teams tell us anything, it’s that the Wild might not be able to escape the first round. To avoid that fate, they’re going to need Dubnyk to return to his spectacular midseason form. But he will also need some help: The other players most responsible for Minnesota’s March slump (Mikko Koivu, Jason Pominville, Nino Niederreiter and Chris Stewart) must take some of the scoring burden from the few who didn’t decline (Eric Staal, Zach Parise and Mikael Granlund). Otherwise, the Wild’s great early-season play will have all been for naught. read more

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Voters must get full 12 Hours

first_img Final seat goes to new opposition party PNP Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, December 15, 2016 – Royal Robinson, PNP Natl Chairman reminds that time lost due to the late opening of any polling place must be made up at the end.  The Ordinance calls for 12 hours of voting and stipulates that Electors must get those 12 hours.All polls opened late according to reports reaching Magnetic Media.  In the Bight, the voting center at Tropicana Show & Supper Club did not open until 7:45am so by law it should close at 7:45pm, says the former Minister and MP. Election Observer Mission reports to Press Change for Turks and Caicos, PDM is New Government Recommended for youcenter_img #MagneticMediaNews#TCIGeneralElections#PollsOpen Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #PollsOpen, #tcigeneralelections Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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Rape trial of Labour court judge goes to trial enough evidence

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#ArthurForbesrapetrialbegins, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, November 24, 2017 – Providenciales – It is onto trial at the Supreme Court in Grand Turk for Arthur Forbes, the Labour Tribunal president who is charged with sexual assault.   A sufficiency hearing held earlier this month in Grand Turk is over and it was determined that there is strong enough evidence to take the matter to trial.Forbes is accused by a housekeeper, who is originally from Haiti, of sexual assault.#MagneticMediaNews#ArthurForbesrapetrialbeginslast_img read more

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Special Report SDSU West land issues

first_img Steve Bosh March 6, 2018 Special Report: SDSU West land issues 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The City Attorney’s memo that KUSI made public Monday raises serious concerns over who would control the Mission Valley site if the SDSU West initiative is approved by the voters in November.The initiative cannot be changed and the memo stated if the land is sold to SDSU, the city loses control of the property, but that may not necessarily be the case.Related Link: KUSI Special Report: Latest on the SDSU West proposalThe initiative anticipates a sales contract that imposes covenants and restrictions on the land to be negotiated after the vote.City Attorney Mara Elliott’s memo stated the city will lose control of the property if it’s sold to SDSU, but there’s always an exception.Kim Kilkenny is with “Friends of San Diego State,” the organization that drafted the SDSU West initiative that will go to the voters.Related Link: Mayor Faulconer speaks about SDSU West and more issues facing the City of San Diego“It would allow the city to sell the site to SDSU and impose a series of conditions. That’s what the initiative requires and it preserves all of the city’s power and all the city’s authority over that site through the sales contract,” Kilkenny said.A sales contract would have to be negotiated with the State University System and would require the state to be bound to any conditions negotiated with the mayor.“It authorizes the city council to establish the sales price at fair market value and to attach conditions to the sales contract through an open and transparent process,” said Mayor Kevin Faulconer.What exactly is a sales contract?Related Link: The future of the Mission Valley siteAccording to former City Attorney Jan Goldsmith, “a sales contract is how you bind each party. This initiative — like the SoccerCity initiative — doesn’t bind the proponents.”If the university wants that property to expand it, they will have to negotiate.“If they don’t think it’s fair value or if they don’t think it’s in the best terms of the interests of the city, they can say no,” Goldsmith said.Goldsmith, like others, said the city is missing an opportunity to give voters something specific rather than the uncertainties offered by both SoccerCity and SDSU.“What I would suggest doing is sending this out for a conditional request for proposal … now,” Goldsmith said.Related Link: ‘Friends of SDSU’ steering committee member defends SDSU WestConditional in case both initiatives fail in November, there would be other offers on the table.“Bring on the offers and then let’s have some public hearings. Let’s hear what we can do with this property,” Goldsmith added.This would give the city total control of the site and give voters more substance and a true picture of what would happen rather than the uncertainties of both initiatives as detailed by the city attorney. Posted: March 6, 2018 Steve Bosh, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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