Small shops maintain market share

The independent retail sector may be finding its niche after decades of pressure from the multiples, according to the latest TNS data.TNS Worldpanel grocery market share figures, published for the 12 weeks ending 17 June 2007, found that the independent sector’s share is stable with growth rates of 8%.Edward Garner, director of research, added that Sainsbury’s and Asda were showing higher percentage growth rates than Tesco, although Tesco still dominates. Morrisons continues to be stable with the 14th successive period of year-on-year growth.Kwik Save, which is awaiting an administration hearing, has seen its share all but disappear after closing 82 stores, said Garner.A reported slow down in spending on groceries is not reflected in the figures, he added. “We will need to watch market shifts closely to assess whether the reports are a seasonal glitch or a long-term change in spending habits.” read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Speech: School Standards Minister at ResearchED

first_imgThank you.It is a pleasure to be back at the ResearchED National Conference once again. This teacher-led movement for a better understanding and use of evidence in education continues to go from strength to strength, and from country to country and also from continent to continent.From Scandanavia to South Africa, Australia to North America, ResearchED is a global movement of teachers seizing back control of their profession.And wherever conferences are held, it is the plurality of voices afforded a platform that defines ResearchED. Today, for example, attendees face the unenviable task of selecting between sessions. From Ben White’s evidence about reducing teacher workload and improving retention, to Cat Scutt’s whistle-stop summary of the evidence for what makes a highly effective teacher.Today – as with all ResearchED conferences – teachers will share the stage with world-leading academics at the cutting edge of their field. Teacher, PhD student and prolific-blogger Greg Ashman, who has flown in from Australia, will be taking a challenging look at the practice of differentiation. Professor Becky Francis will be discussing issues of equity in the context of the Institute for Education’s work on ability grouping.Stephen Tierney – Chair of the Headteachers’ Round Table – will be sharing his experience of building an evidence-informed school. And Mark Lehain – Director of the New Schools Network and Parents and Teachers for Excellence – will be sharing his expertise on implementing a knowledge rich curriculum. And Professor Daniel Muijs will be sharing the extensive work that Ofsted has been doing on how to improve the validity and reliability of school inspections.The diversity of viewpoints and research interests means that ResearchED lends evidence-informed and nuanced voices to the great debates of education.One such debate is the ‘knowledge vs skills’ debate. This important debate is decades old, but – somewhat paradoxically – as our understanding of how children learn has improved, the debate has become more polarised.There is no doubt that in our ever more globalised world, one of the key purposes of education is to prepare the next generation to thrive in the 21st century. We must ensure that pupils are equipped with both powerful knowledge and the skills needed for this century.And yet, the new technologies and seemingly ever changing world of the new millennium – now commonly referred to as the ‘4th Industrial Revolution’ – shouldn’t be an excuse to give way to romantic notions that education needs overhauling.All around the world, the desire to react to the unprecedented pace of technological change has led to many experts and commentators proclaiming knowledge-rich education redundant. Here is one example from a commentator in the Guardian:‘In the future, if you want a job, you must be as unlike a machine as possible: creative, critical and socially skilled. So why are children being taught to behave like machines? Children learn best when teaching aligns with their natural exuberance, energy and curiosity. So why are they dragooned into rows and made to sit still while they are stuffed with facts?’George Monbiot went on to repeat the trope, comparing schools to factories:‘Our schools were designed to produce the workforce required by 19th-century factories. The desired product was workers who would sit silently at their benches all day, behaving identically, to produce identical products, submitting to punishment if they failed to achieve the requisite standards. Collaboration and critical thinking were just what the factory owners wished to discourage.’Sir Ken Robinson is possibly the most famous modern proponent of this critique of schools, which – in his view – too often fail to prepare children for the world of today because of their rigidity, traditional focus on knowledge and discrete subjects and their standardised approach. But the image of children as passive recipients of education is actually centuries old, with its roots in the romantic Rousseauian notion that:‘Man was born free, and he is everywhere in chains.’There is concern that the type of education provided by schools will not only fail to prepare children for the future, but will actively hinder their chances of thriving in the 21st century. The words of Jean Jacques Rousseau echo through the writing of Sir Ken Robinson when he wrote:‘We are all born with extraordinary powers of imagination, intelligence, feeling, intuition, spirituality, and of physical and sensory awareness.’Implicitly – but powerfully – these statements provide the emotional underpinning for centuries of opposition to schooling that prioritises powerful knowledge being passed from subject-expert teachers to novice pupils.Sir Ken Robinson makes this argument explicit in his proposals for the future of schooling:‘The world is changing faster than ever in our history. Our best hope for the future is to develop a new paradigm of human capacity to meet a new era of human existence. We need to evolve a new appreciation of the importance of nurturing human talent along with an understanding of how talent expresses itself differently in every individual.’But – just as with the romantic notion underlying these arguments – the idea that education must change to equip children to cope with the future is not new either. At international education conferences and in newspaper columns, it is not uncommon to hear the following argument advanced:‘We find ourselves in a rapidly changing and unpredictable culture. It seems almost impossible to foresee the particular ways in which it will change in the near future or the particular problems which will be paramount in five or ten years. Under these conditions, much emphasis must be placed in the schools on the development of generalized ways of attacking problems and on knowledge which can be applied to a wide range of new situations.’But this was written by the educationalist Benjamin Bloom in 1956.Similarly, we are told that having google perpetually at the tip of our fingers means knowledge no longer matters as it once did. It is not unfamiliar to hear therefore that, and I quote:‘Educated people are not those who know everything, but rather those who know where to find, at a moment’s notice, the information they desire.’But this was written in 1914.So lamentations about out-dated approaches to schooling might not be new, but they are believed widely. These ideas have been repeated throughout the 20th century and are no less popular now.ResearchED therefore has a vital role to play in promoting evidence-informed voices and adding nuance to the polarised debates that often obscure the way forward in education.In the ‘knowledge vs skills’ debate, whatever side of the debate you are on, and whatever other purposes you believe education should serve, we all share some common aims. It is our shared goal to ensure that the next generation is best prepared to work collaboratively on, think critically about, and solve difficult problems.To this extent, the debate is not a debate about ends. It is about means. How do we prepare the next generation to solve the great problems of the future? How do we ensure that all pupils – whatever their background – are equipped to thrive in the wide variety of jobs they will enter?We all seek the answers to these questions. And differences of opinion of course should be expected. But we should also expect opinions to be evidence-informed, which is where ResearchED plays such an important role.But even on the question of means, there is much shared common ground. Take literacy, for example. Today is International Literacy Day. Whilst all teachers want to ensure that pupils learn to read early in primary school, debate has raged for decades as to how best to achieve this end.Since 2010, the government has focused relentlessly on ensuring teachers use evidence-based systematic synthetic phonics programmes, resulting in a revolution in the success of literacy teaching in primary schools. In 2012, just 58% of 6 year olds were on track to be fluent readers. Last year, that figure stood at 81% – with the number rising to 92% for 7 year olds.By ensuring that children know the letter-sound correspondences of the English alphabetical code and teaching children the skill of ‘blending’, evidence based phonics programmes have transformed the success of early reading instruction.The overwhelming evidence in favour of using a systematic phonics programme irrevocably changed the debate about literacy. No longer is the question whether to use a ‘whole word’ approach or a phonics approach. Instead, the question is which phonics programme is most effective. The evidence – and teachers’ application of it – means that the debate has evolved. Better-informed and more research-inclined teachers have left behind the small number of commentators who continue to bemoan the use of phonics and continue to promote ‘look and say’.And a similar process in underway in the ‘knowledge vs skills’ debate. This debate must consider the implications of decades of cognitive science research. There are two cognitive scientists – closely associated with ResearchED – who have helped to shape and sharpen my thoughts in this debate.Professor Daniel Willingham adorns the front cover of my copy of the ResearchED magazine. He has written extensively and authoritatively about critical thinking and the difficulties faced by teachers trying to teach it discretely. Describing these difficulties, he wrote:‘Knowing that one should think critically is not the same as being able to do so. That requires domain knowledge and practise.’The challenge to proponents of a radical overhaul of schooling, which prioritises skills in place of powerful knowledge, is how to reconcile this view with the cognitive science research pointing to the importance of knowledge. Critical thinking relies on deep reserves of domain-specific knowledge. Using an example from an American history curriculum, Willingham exemplifies this point. He says:‘Knowing that a letter was written by a Confederate private to his wife in New Orleans just after the Battle of Vicksburg won’t help the student interpret the letter– unless he knows something of Civil War history.’The ‘knowledge vs skills’ debate is concerned with how we best prepare pupils to think critically about problems, not whether we want children to think critically – whatever the image of ‘factory schools’ might imply.Professor Paul Kirschner – who is speaking today – is a world-leading cognitive science researcher whose contributions to our understanding of education include the seminal paper ‘Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work’ – written with John Sweller and Richard Clark.Writing about the importance of domain-specific knowledge and the differences between experts and novices– again with John Sweller – he emphasises the importance of knowledge. And I quote:‘When given a problem to solve, novices’ only resource is their very constrained working memory while experts have both their working-memory and all the relevant knowledge and skill stored in long-term memory.’If we want pupils to become the great critical thinkers and problem solvers of the future, it is incumbent upon schools to ensure children are endowed with the powerful knowledge which best equips them to approach problems as experts.This knowledge-rich approach guided our reform of all the subjects in the National Curriculum in 2014, and we plan to build on this success through the Curriculum Fund, where we are making £7.7 million available over the next five years to encourage greater use of well-sequenced, high quality, knowledge rich curriculum programmes in classrooms.But the reliance of skills on domain-specific knowledge stored in long term memory is not the final word in the ‘knowledge vs skills’ debate. What knowledge leverages the greatest reward? How often do we need to update or redefine the knowledge future generations will need? How do we help children to use and apply their knowledge to think critically about a problem?These questions, concerned with the detail that underlies the ‘knowledge vs skills’ debate, affect pedagogy, and they affect policy. Consider, for example, the change in the national curriculum towards a focus on computer science and away from ICT.This curriculum change reflects how the knowledge needed to thrive can and does evolve. Just as touch-typing and word processing were – and are – important, it is crucial that the next generation leaves school with an understanding of the principles of programming. And early indications are that, this year, there have been huge increases in the number of pupils taking computer science at GCSE and A level.Just as proponents of a greater focus on skills must have regard to the evidence on the importance of domain-specific knowledge, we must also understand the detail and the nuances in the arguments about the vital role of knowledge in education.Evidence-informed debates foster that nuance and advance our understanding. ResearchED provides a platform for a plurality of evidence-informed voices, so that teachers and researchers can share their knowledge and move beyond the tribalism that too often attracts headlines and blights progress.ResearchED doesn’t have the power to stop lamentations about factory schools turning out identikit pupils ready for 19th century factory labour. But it has helped to advance an understanding of evidence, inoculating teachers from ideological headwinds and helping to inform better teaching – and, I have to say, better policy.For that reason, it is a pleasure to be back again.Thank you.last_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Between the lines

first_imgHarvard Bound offers an intimate look into the reading life of faculty members. For this segment, we asked Stephen Burt, Josh Bell, and Jane Rosenzweig — three avid readers, as well as writers — to divulge a book that influenced them in their work, and to read a passage from it.Soundbytes: Stephen BurtProfessor of English and noted poetry critic Stephen Burt reads from D.A. Powell’s poetry collection “Chronic.” “It’s a book I’ve been coming back to and back to ever since it came out in 2009,” said Burt.Soundbytes: Jane RosenzweigThe director of the Harvard College Writing Center reads a passage from “Open Secrets” by Alice Munro. “I discovered this story … when I was a student at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop right around the time that Frank Conroy, who was the program’s legendary director, ripped the last three pages off of one of my short stories and threw them in the garbage …”Soundbytes: Josh BellPoet Josh Bell, the Briggs-Copeland Lecturer on English and author of “No Planets Strike,” discusses “a weird pick … it’s a short section of a poem from a longer epic poem called ‘The Baal Cycle,’ an ancient Ugaritic poem about conflict between gods and goddesses.”last_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Long Island Braces for 1st Heat Wave of Summer

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Long Beach police beach patrol officer watches the beachgoes on a recent sunny afternoon (Photo by Joe Abate)Officials are warning Long Islanders to keep cool as the region braces for its first potential heat wave of summer as temperatures hit the 90s Monday and humidity makes it feel like it’s over 100.A heat advisory is in effect for Nassau County, although Suffolk County is close to joining their neighbors to the west as the Island heats up this week, according to Upton-based National Weather Service meteorologists.“We are in store for a very long week,” said Ashley Sears, an NWS forecaster who urged the public to stay in air conditioning, wear light clothing, keep hydrated and avoid outdoor activity.A heat wave is defined by three or more consecutive days in which temps break 90 degrees, which forecasters are predicting will happen for the first time this year on LI.Monday is expected to hit a high of 95, Tuesday is predicted to reach 93, Wednesday may top 90, Thursday is on tap for 91 and Friday is forecast to hit 92 before rain cools things off this weekend.Cooling centers were being opened in the Town of Hempstead and beaches are being kept open late in Riverhead as well as Brookhaven town. Nassau County extended closing time at pools and beaches until 8 p.m. at Cantiague Park, Christopher Morley Park, Nickerson Beach, North Woodmere and Wantagh Park.Nassau and Suffolk SCPA officials also reminded pet owners to keep animal companions cool with fresh bowls of cool water, shade, a hose or kiddy pool and not lock pets in hot, parked vehicles.last_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Arsenal want to name Monchi or Marc Overmars as director of football immediately

first_imgArsenal want to name Monchi or Marc Overmars as director of football immediately Arsenal are concerned the season is in crisis (Picture: Rex Features) Emery after defeat to BATE: ‘We deserved to win’To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:46FullscreenEmery after defeat to BATE: ‘We deserved to win’https://metro.co.uk/video/emery-defeat-bate-deserved-win-1863852/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.The Sun claim Arsenal have held talks with Monchi and Marc Overmars and want to appoint a new supremo immediately.ADVERTISEMENTRoma’s Monchi is seen as a leading candidate as being respected in the football world as one of, if not the best, sporting directors in the game.AdvertisementAdvertisementMonchi is being tracked by a host of top clubs, which means Arsenal could focus their attentions on enlisting Overmars. Coral BarrySaturday 16 Feb 2019 8:36 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link408Shares Comment Roma’s Monchi is in the frame for the job (Picture: Getty)The Dutchman has impressed in six years at Ajax where he oversaw the development of talented youngsters Matthijs De Ligt and Frenkie De Jong.With Overmars, there is also the added bonus of the 45-year-old’s ties to Arsenal, having played for the club under Arsene Wenger.Arsenal’s season is on the verge of going off the rails after a disastrous 1-0 defeat to European minnows BATE Borisov in the Europa League.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man Citycenter_img Advertisement Ajax’s Overmars has history with Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Alexandre Lacazette was sent off during the clash for an elbow and club bosses thinks a director of football may be able to steady the ship.Although Unai Emery is in no danger of losing his job, the Spaniard and his players have struggled for consistency this season.Arsenal sit fifth in the Premier League table, a point behind Manchester United and fourth place.MORE: Mesut Ozil determined to stay at Arsenal despite rift with Unai Emery Emery could do nothing as Arsenal slumped to defeat to BATE Borisov (Picture: Getty)Arsenal want to appoint a director of football immediately after holding talks with two candidates, reports say.The Gunners are in need of new leadership at the helm of the club’s hierarchy after head of recruitment Sven Mislintat and chief executive Ivan Gazidis quit in recent months.Mislintat reportedly left after he was told he would not be considered for the director of football post. Advertisementlast_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Parent 1 Parent 2 appear on UK PC passport form

first_imgMail Online 3 October 2011For decades, passport applicants have been required to provide details of their mother and father. But now, after pressure from the gay lobby, they will be given the option of naming ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2’. The change, which is due to take place within weeks, has been made following claims the original form was ‘discriminatory’ and failed to include same-sex couples looking after a child. It has led to claims the official travel document is being turned into a ‘PC passport’. Campaigners for family values said the move ‘denigrated’ the roles of parents bringing up children in traditional families.…The decision follows the revelation last month that details of the holder’s sex could be erased from all passports to spare transgender people from embarrassment.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2044491/PC-passport-Goodbye-mother-father-Now-Parent-1-2-appear-form.html#ixzz1ZlhLrnSLlast_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Are paedophiles’ brains wired differently?

first_imgBBC News 24 November 2015There has been immense concern in recent years over the scale of child sexual abuse. But even after years of study and investigation there’s still disagreement over what causes paedophiles to be the way they are, writes Richard Sanders.“People, they think ‘why should we help the paedophile? We should be prosecuting them, throwing them in jail, having them castrated’. But if we offer help to paedophiles we might save children who might have been abused.”These were the remarkable words of Paul Jones, father of April Jones who was abducted and murdered by a paedophile in October 2012. There was evidence that Mark Bridger had been looking at child pornography online in the hours leading to her abduction.Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.Now Paul and his wife Coral are campaigning for better understanding of child sex abuse – including offering help to paedophiles to prevent them from offending. For them this is key to protecting children from harm.Dr James Cantor, of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Canada, spends much of his time exploring the brains of paedophiles using MRI scans. He has reached a startling and controversial conclusion.“Paedophilia is a sexual orientation,” he says. “Paedophilia is something that we are essentially born with, does not appear to change over time and it’s as core to our being as any other sexual orientation is.”http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34858350?utm_source=Christian+Concern&utm_campaign=1076b389ed-WN-2015-11-28&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_9e164371ca-1076b389ed-127299873last_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Tomori recalls his important Brighton loan spell

first_imgFikayo Tomori’s first significant steps in senior football came during a four-month loan spell at Brighton in 2017. Ahead of our trip to the Amex three years on, the defender has reflected on that formative period on the South Coast and assessed today’s meeting between the Seagulls and Chelsea. England international Fikayo Tomori When Tomori switched to Brighton midway through 2016/17 he had one senior Chelsea appearance to his name, which came as a substitute against Leicester on the final day of the previous campaign. He was also named the Chelsea Academy Player of the Year. It was clear a move into regular men’s football was the next step, and Championship high-fliers Brighton was the destination of choice for the 19-year-old. ‘It was a big part of my development, playing every day with professionals who have been playing the game for 10, 15 years,’ recalls Tomori. ‘That focus, will to win and need to be at the top of your game every game was something I had to learn, and it was really important for my development. ‘I went there in January and went into the team when it was top of the league and everything was going really well in the Championship. They were trying to get their first promotion to the Premier League. The team was really together and focused, and when the games came they were really on it. ‘It was my first taste of senior football and being in a senior changing room, and being part of a matchday and stuff like that. It was a great learning experience and obviously we got promoted which was great.’ Brighton finished as Championship runners-up behind Newcastle, with Tomori accruing 10 appearances and featuring in big games against the likes of Leeds and the eventual title winners. After further loans in England’s second tier with Hull City and Derby, Tomori returned to the fold at Stamford Bridge this summer and has since shone under the guidance of Frank Lampard. He already has 19 appearances to his name this season, one of which came against his former club back in September. Ahead of the reverse meeting this afternoon, Tomori has explained what will make the Seagulls such a dangerous outfit. ‘We played them at the Bridge before and you could see they are playing differently under a new manager. They are possession-based and I’m sure at the Amex they’ll be confident and take the game to us. Read Also:Fikayo Tomori signs new five-year contract with Chelsea ‘They have had good results against teams at home and we will have to be on our game. We have been a bit up and down recently, so we need to find that consistency. To be a top team you can’t be up and down form-wise. ‘We’re working on that. The Arsenal game was a good start, and now we go to Brighton and can hopefully get two wins on the bounce.’ FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThese Films Were Sued For The Weirdest ReasonsBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesWhat Happens When You Eat Eggs Every Single Day?10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her GrandsonBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?7 Things That Actually Ruin Your PhoneEverything You Need To Know About Asteroid Armageddoncenter_img Loading… last_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Cardinals Volleyball Results Against Trojans

first_imgSt. Louis 7th Grade VolleyballThe St. Louis Cardinal 7th Grade Volleyball team was defeated by the St. Michael’s Trojans. 25-6, 25-16.The Cardinals had problems with passing the ball in the first set as one Trojan served 16 straight points. That all changed in the second set. The Cardinals held their ground until the middle of the set. Lilly Schebler and Sylvia Eckstein passed the ball well to their teammates. 00Kate Weber and Allie Savage were the top servers with 3 points each followed by Hope Kroen with 2 points and Isabel Price and Sylvia Eckstein contributed 1 point each.St. Louis 8th Grade VolleyballSt. Louis Cardinal 8th Grade Volleyball Team defeated the St. Michael’s Trojans with an exciting match. 25-16, 24-25, 15-8.In the first set, the Cardinals jumped to an early lead as Regina Gerstbauer served 10 straight points to help secure the win. The second set was a battle. Ellie Cornett served 10 points to put the Cardinal in the lead 15-5. The Cardinals fell back on their heels and allowed the Trojans to come back and tied up the set 18-18. The rest of the set was battle back and forth until the Trojans finished the set on top. The Cardinals came out strong for the last set. Cornett served 6 points to push the Cardinals in the lead 6-3. The team stayed on top for the rest of the set for the win. The offense was led by Tekulve with 4 spikes and 1 kill and led the defense with one outstanding block.Cornett led the team with 20 points just ahead of Gerstbauer with 14 points which includes 4 aces followed by Chelsea Robertson with 4 points and 1 ace, Tekulve with 2 points and Elizabeth Gigrich with 1 point.Courtesy of Cardinals Coach Jennifer Meer.last_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment

Michael A. Summey age, 62

first_imgMichael A. Summey, age 62, of Brookville, Indiana died Friday, October 20, 2017 at St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana.Born December 1, 1954 in Hamilton, Ohio he was the son of John & Dorothy Louise (Walker) Summey. On August 15, 1981 he and the former Deborah K. Holman were united in marriage and she survives.Mike was retired, having worked as an GM ASE Certified Master Technician for much of his life.Besides Deborah, his loving wife of over 36 years, survivors include two sons, Michael Aaron (Christina) Summey of Greensburg, Indiana and Adam Joel Summey of Brookville; two grandsons, Logan Michael Summey and Ethan Carter Summey; his mother, Dorothy Louise Summey of Brookville; six sisters, Gail Kaiser, Maxine Clark, Brenda Tomlin, Joyce (Tom II) Davis, Jenny (Dave) Ryckman, Ramona (Kenny) Alig; two brothers, Gary (Carol) Summey and Ed (Tina) Summey; as well as many nieces & nephews.He was preceded in death by his father, John Summey; two sisters, Minnie Watson and Berter Troutman; and two brothers, Howard Summey and Walter Summey.Family & friends may visit from 4 until 8 P.M. on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Avenue, Brookville.Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home is honored to serve the Summey family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.comlast_img read more

Continue reading
htufqusm
Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /www/wwwroot/shyllm.com/wp-content/themes/bizmo/content.php on line 65
Leave a comment